Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose you have the following file:

textfield,datetimefield,numfield
foo,2008-07-01 17:50:55.004688,1
bar,2008-07-02 17:50:55.004688,2

The Ruby code to read a .csv is something like:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

require 'csv'

csv = CSV($stdin, :headers => true, :converters => :all)
csv.each do |row|
  print "#{row}"
  the_date = row['datetimefield'].to_date
end

That code gives this error message:

./foo2.rb:8:in `block in <main>': undefined method `to_date' for "2008-07-01 17:50:55.004688":String (NoMethodError)

What gives?

I've read the docs, but I don't get it.

Edit: Yes, I could parse the fields individually. The point of this question is that I want to learn how to use the documented converters feature.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your date times don't match the CSV::DateTimeMatcher regexp that CSV uses to decide whether it should attempt a date time conversion. By the looks of it it's doing so because of the fractional seconds you've got.

You could either overwrite that constant or write your own converter (DateTime.parse seems happy with your strings)

share|improve this answer
    
Aha, good job. If I remove the fractional seconds, it works. Thus, I accept your answer. This is surprising, since the docs say ":date_time: Converts any field DateTime::parse() accepts." and ":all: All built-in converters. A combination of :date_time and :numeric.". That is, :all uses :date_time, which uses DateTime.parse(), which you say accepts the fractional seconds. So, the docs are wrong? (That is, they claim any DateTime.parse() but actually have a mismatched regex?) –  dfrankow Jan 18 '12 at 16:34
    
@dfrankow Nothing wrong with your reasoning. There is a weird regex in csv.rb testing if a string looks like a datetime. It does not reckognize valid dates. I filed a bug. –  steenslag Jan 18 '12 at 16:40
    
Another way to put this: The use of :all above is essentially as the docs intend? (I couldn't find any real examples from Google.) –  dfrankow Jan 18 '12 at 16:42
    
@steenslag: +1 to filing a bug. Good job! –  dfrankow Jan 18 '12 at 16:43
    
I landed here because formats like "03/02/2012" aren't getting recognized (mm/dd/yyyy instead of yyyy first), and I don't know how to override DateMatcher in the docs. –  Marcos Mar 30 '12 at 0:26
add comment

You are asking how to use converters.

My example defines the usage of a new converter mytime. The converter my_time tries to build a time object if possible.

#Define test data
src = <<csv
textfield,datetimefield,numfield
foo,2008-07-01 17:50:55.004688,1
bar,2008-07-02 17:50:55.004688,2
csv

require 'csv'
require 'time'
CSV::Converters[:mytime] = lambda{|s| 
  begin 
    Time.parse(s)
  rescue ArgumentError
    s
  end
}

csv = CSV(src, :headers => true, :converters => [:mytime])
csv.each do |row|
  print "#{row}"
  the_date = row['datetimefield'].to_date
end

Using this technique, you may also define a converter to create a date from time-like strings. This solution also keeps all other converters.

#define test data
src = <<csv
textfield,datetimefield,numfield
foo,2008-07-01 17:50:55.004688,1
bar,2008-07-02 17:50:55.004688,2
csv

require 'csv'
require 'time'
CSV::Converters[:time2date] = lambda{|s| 
  begin 
    Time.parse(s).to_date
  rescue ArgumentError
    s
  end
}

csv = CSV(src, :headers => true, :converters => CSV::Converters.keys + [:time2date])
csv.each do |row|
  print "#{row}"
  p row['datetimefield'] #Date-field
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

String#to_date is a Rails method. What you want is probably something like

Time.parse(row['datetimefield'])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. 1) Ruby::CSV has converter functionality that I am trying to learn, so I don't want to parse separately; 2) to_date is a Ruby::DateTime function, not a Rails function (ruby-doc.org/stdlib-1.9.3/libdoc/date/rdoc/…). –  dfrankow Jan 18 '12 at 2:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.