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Given a pcap file, I'm able to extract a lot of information from the reconstructed HTTP request and responses using the neat filters provided by Wireshark. I've also been able to split the pcap file into each TCP stream.

Trouble I'm running into now is that of all the cool filters I'm able to use with tshark, I can't find one that will let me print out full request/response bodies. I'm calling something like this:

 tshark -r dump.pcap -R "tcp.stream==123 and http.request" -T fields -e http.request.uri

Is there some filter name I can pass to -e to get the request/response body? The closest I've come is to use the -V flag, but it also prints out a bunch of information I don't necessary want and want to avoid having to kludge out with a "dumb" filter.

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What was the snarflen of the original capture. If you didnt collect the full packet you probably have the data. –  Adrian Cornish Jan 18 '12 at 1:21
    
The captures were fine. The MTU on the interface I used was 1514 and I did a capture of 1600. I opened the pcap in Wireshark and can get individual request-response pairs as streams; I was just looking for a way to script against it. –  Steven Xu Jan 18 '12 at 5:36
    
Cool - just ruling out the most obvious –  Adrian Cornish Jan 18 '12 at 5:41
    
What about TShark option -O (-O protocols: Only show packet details of these protocols, comma separated) $ tshark -r clmt_04.pcap -R "http.request or http.response" -V -O http > http.txt –  joke Jan 18 '12 at 20:41
    
@joke: It wouldn't appear that I get request/response bodies with -O. Can you confirm you're getting them on your side? –  Steven Xu Jan 18 '12 at 21:13
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1 Answer

If you are willing to switch to another tool, tcptrace can do this with the -e option. It also has an HTTP analysis extension (xHTTP option) that generates the HTTP request/repsonse pairs for each TCP stream.

Here is a usage example:

tcptrace --csv -xHTTP -f'port=80' -lten capturefile.pcap
  • --csv to format output as comma sperated variable
  • -xHTTP for HTTP request/response written to 'http.times' this also switches on -e to dump the TCP stream payloads, so you really don't need -e as well
  • -f'port=80' to filter out non-web traffic
  • -l for long output form
  • -t to give me progress indication
  • -n to turn off hostname resolution (much faster without this)
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I used tcptrace. It's pretty promising. Thanks! For some strange reason, just using tcptrace -e my.dump didn't separate out requests correctly. I suspect this is just a case of me doing something wrong since Wireshark does the same splitting just fine, so I'll poke into it a little bit more. If you had a one-liner at the top of your head to extract request-response pairs from a standard pcap file (unfortunately with a handful of cut off packets), I'm all ears :). –  Steven Xu Jan 24 '12 at 15:17
    
added an example - this works for me, but I'm sure you will run into issues if yu have truncated packets –  rupello Jan 26 '12 at 14:28
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