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I made a finally simulator using lambda in C++11 as below:

#include <cstdio>

template<typename Functor>
struct Finalizer
{
    Finalizer(Functor& func) : func_(func) {} // (1)
    ~Finalizer() { func_(); }

private:
    Functor func_; // (2)
};

template<typename functor>
Finalizer<functor> finally(functor& func)
{
    return Finalizer<functor>(func); (3)
}

int main()
{
    int a = 20;

    // print the value of a at the escape of the scope
    auto finalizer = finally([&]{ printf("%d\n", a); }); // (4)
}

The code works as intended, but there is undesired copy ctor call (of lambda functor) at the ctor of Finalizer struct (1). (Thankfully, copy construction at the return statement in the finally function (3 -> 4) is avoided by RVO.)

Compiler does not eliminate the copy ctor call (at least in vc10 - gcc may optimize it), and if the type of the functor in Finalizer struct (2) is changed to reference it'll crash since the lambda argument at the finally call (4) is r-value.

Of course the code can be "optimized" like below

template<typename Functor>
struct Finalizer
{
    Finalizer(Functor& func) : func_(func) {}
    ~Finalizer() { func_(); }

private:
    Functor& func_;
};

int main()
{
    int a = 20;

    auto finalizer = [&]{ printf("%d\n", a); };
    Finalizer<decltype(finalizer)> fin(finalizer);
}

No overhead, only a printf call is placed at the end of scope. But... I don't like it. :( I tried to wrap it with macro, but it needs to declare two "name" - one for lambda object, the other for finalizer object.

My objective is simple -

  1. Every unnecessary performance overhead which can be avoided should be eliminated. Ideally, there should be no function call, every procedure should be inlined.
  2. Keep the concise expression as its purpose of utility function. Use of macro is allowed, but discouraged.

Is there any solution to avoid it for this situation?

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1  
At least say template<typename functor> Finalizer<functor> finally(functor&& func) { return Finalizer<typename std::remove_reference<functor>::type>(std::forward<functor>(func)); }. –  Kerrek SB Jan 18 '12 at 1:11
    
If you need to copy the lambda because it's a member of the class, then you need to copy it, end of story. But what's the problem - at best a ref-capturing lambda will contain a few references which are not expensive to copy. –  Kerrek SB Jan 18 '12 at 1:14
    
This is what C++ rvalue references were made for. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 18 '12 at 1:14
    
Thanks for every answers. (And sorry for my slow reaction - my english is short :( ) I tried to use R-value, it does not solve the problem. I think Kerrek SB is right - the root of the problem is the fact that lambda object itself is instantiated as temporary object. Maybe simulating something like normal order evaluation in compile time is needed to solve this problem. (I don't even know whether it's possible or not) –  summerlight Jan 18 '12 at 1:38
    
Using a reference member is ill-advised as the lifetime of the object it is bound to will never be extended, and the reference will be left dangling as soon as the constructor is done running. –  Luc Danton Jan 20 '12 at 13:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I presume lambdas have move constructors? If so, and if you will only ever use rvalues inside finally, then && and forward will move rather than copy.

#include <cstdio>

template<typename Functor>
struct Finalizer
{
    Finalizer(Functor&& func) : func_(std::forward(func)) {} // (1)
    ~Finalizer() { func_(); }

private:
    Functor func_; // (2)
};

template<typename functor>
Finalizer<std::remove_reference<functor>::type> finally(functor&& func)
{
    return Finalizer<std::remove_reference<functor>::type>(std::forward(func)); // (3)
}

int main()
{
    int a = 20;

    // print the value of a at the escape of the scope
    auto finalizer = finally([&]{ printf("%d\n", a); }); // (4)
}

It should be possible to right something more intelligent that will work correctly with lvalues too, so that you're 'optimized' version will compile and will copy when it cannot move. In that case, I suggest you use something like Functor<std::remove_reference<functor>::type> to be sure that the Functor is of the right type, regardless of whether the parameters were passed around by & or && or whatever.

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This answer of mine is still a bit broken. I'll make it community-wiki. It's too late at night for me to write correct code :-) –  Aaron McDaid Jan 18 '12 at 1:32
1  
This solution has the problem that two functors may end up being called if elision doesn't take place: once when the destructor of the temporary generated by the call to finally (at the end of the statement) runs, and once at the end of the scope when finalizer is destroyed. This problem is also present in the question (the version without a reference). –  Luc Danton Jan 20 '12 at 13:17
    
@LucDanton, Good point. I hadn't thought of that at the time. The temporary that's passed to finally is a functor type, it is not a Finalizer type. Therefore, there will be no attempt to execute it. We don't care how many functors are created and destroyed. We care only about how many Finalizer objects are created and destroyed - this is the problem. The temporary that returns from finally is of type Finalizer. If we're lucky, the compiler will optimize and use RVO and so on to guarantee that exactly one Finalizer will be created. auto_ptr<Finalizer> maybe? –  Aaron McDaid Jan 20 '12 at 14:13
    
@LucDanton, (assuming C++11), maybe another solution is to make Finalizer non-copyable and move-able only. And to arrange for the move constructor to ensure that the original object is marked in such as way that it doesn't run the functor? if (still_a_real_object) this->func_(); –  Aaron McDaid Jan 20 '12 at 14:15
    
Indeed. My personal solution (as I have a finally-like utility) is to have a bool member that tracks the status of the object, and have the move constructor update that member when pilfering its argument. –  Luc Danton Jan 20 '12 at 14:20

Perhaps accept the functor argument to the constructor as an rvalue reference?

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