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I want to write a C++ metafunction is_callable<F, Arg> that defines value to be true, if and only if the type F has the function call operator of the form SomeReturnType operator()(const Arg &). For example, in the following case

struct foo {
  void operator(const int &) {}
};

I want is_callable<foo, int &> to be false and is_callable<foo, const int &> to be true. This is what I have so far :

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

template<typename F, typename Arg>
struct is_callable {
private:

  template<typename>
  static char (&test(...))[2];

  template<unsigned>
  struct helper {
    typedef void *type;
  };

  template<typename UVisitor>
  static char test(
               typename helper<
                 sizeof(std::declval<UVisitor>()(std::declval<Arg>()), 0)
                 >::type
               );
public:
  static const bool value = (sizeof(test<F>(0)) == sizeof(char));
};

struct foo {
  void operator()(const int &) {}
};

using namespace std;

int main(void)
{
  cout << is_callable<foo, int &>::value << "\n";
  cout << is_callable<foo, const int &>::value << "\n";

  return 0;
}

This prints 1 and 1, but I want 0 and 1 because foo only defines void operator()(const int &).

share|improve this question
    
I have an idea using is_constructible along with a helper class which contains a member of type decltype(F()(Arg())), but it's getting a bit more involved than my attention span permits just now. I think if this whole class were to be put into a SFINAE test, it might work. –  Kerrek SB Jan 18 '12 at 1:29
    
I'm also interested in a solution to this problem, particularly one which would handle cases where foo::operator() is overloaded and/or a template. –  Jared Hoberock Jan 18 '12 at 1:59
    
decltype(F()(Arg())) will not work as expected, as Arg will be again converted from const int to int. –  j_kubik Jan 18 '12 at 2:07
3  
"I want is_callable<foo, int &> to be false and is_callable<foo, const int &> to be true." But won't that be a lie? You can pass a non-const reference to a function that takes a const&. Presumably, you want is_callable to be true if you can call the function with the given parameter, not if the function takes that parameter's value directly. Yes? –  Nicol Bolas Jan 18 '12 at 5:05
    
@Nicol: I agree that is_callable isn't the right name for such a trait, nevertheless, it's an interesting trait to design. –  Ben Voigt Jan 18 '12 at 5:20
show 4 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

After hours of playing around and some serious discussions in the C++ chat room, we finally got a version that works for functors with possibly overloaded or inherited operator() and for function pointers, based on @KerrekSB's and @BenVoigt's versions.

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename F, typename... Args>
class Callable{
  static int tester[1];
  typedef char yes;
  typedef yes (&no)[2];

  template <typename G, typename... Brgs, typename C>
  static typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<G,C>::value, char>::type
      sfinae(decltype(std::declval<G>()(std::declval<Brgs>()...)) (C::*pfn)(Brgs...));

  template <typename G, typename... Brgs, typename C>
  static typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<G,C>::value, char>::type
      sfinae(decltype(std::declval<G>()(std::declval<Brgs>()...)) (C::*pfn)(Brgs...) const);

  template <typename G, typename... Brgs>
  static char sfinae(decltype(std::declval<G>()(std::declval<Brgs>()...)) (G::*pfn)(Brgs...));

  template <typename G, typename... Brgs>
  static char sfinae(decltype(std::declval<G>()(std::declval<Brgs>()...)) (G::*pfn)(Brgs...) const);

  template <typename G, typename... Brgs>
  static yes test(int (&a)[sizeof(sfinae<G,Brgs...>(&G::operator()))]);

  template <typename G, typename... Brgs>
  static no test(...);

public:
  static bool const value = sizeof(test<F, Args...>(tester)) == sizeof(yes);
};

template<class R, class... Args>
struct Helper{ R operator()(Args...); };

template<typename R, typename... FArgs, typename... Args>
class Callable<R(*)(FArgs...), Args...>
  : public Callable<Helper<R, FArgs...>, Args...>{};

Live example on Ideone. Note that the two failing tests are overloaded operator() tests. This is a GCC bug with variadic templates, already fixed in GCC 4.7. Clang 3.1 also reports all tests as passed.

If you want operator() with default arguments to fail, there is a possible way to do that, however some other tests will start failing at that point and I found it as too much hassle to try and correct that.

Edit: As @Johannes correctly notes in the comment, we got a little inconsistency in here, namely that functors which define a conversion to function pointer will not be detected as "callable". This is, imho, pretty non-trivial to fix, as such I won't bother with it (for now). If you absolutely need this trait, well, leave a comment and I'll see what I can do.


Now that all this has been said, IMHO, the idea for this trait is stupid. Why whould you have such exact requirements? Why would the standard is_callable not suffice?

(Yes, I think the idea is stupid. Yes, I still went and built this. Yes, it was fun, very much so. No, I'm not insane. Atleast that's what I believe...)

share|improve this answer
    
Function pointers do not have an operator() so they ahould report that they are not callable according to the question. Otherwise if you want to catch any callable type, you need to handle also class types that have a conversion function to function pointer or reference type. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 18 '12 at 9:23
    
@Johannes: The first part is rather easy, just let the partial spec of Callable have a static bool const value = false; member instead of inheriting from itself. The second part... is a good point that could get slightly complicated so I'm not gonna bother with it for now. :( This answer is also missing tests for volatile or ref-qualifed member functions, but those are rather easy to add, although it gets very messy in the number of sfinae overloads. –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 9:52
    
@Xeo : Quick question ... when are the three-template argument versions of sfinae instantiated? I went to your example on ideone and commented out those template functions, and got the same results. –  Jason Jan 18 '12 at 14:03
    
@Jason: That's interesting. Theoretically they're there for the Inh case, where the operator() is inherited, because in that case the class-type of the member function pointer differs from the class-type you want to test (&Inh::operator() is of type int (Bar::*)(int const&)). I got a FAILED there before I added those overloads that deduce the class-type on the pointer. Lemme recheck... –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 14:38
    
@Xeo: here is what I was seeing ... –  Jason Jan 18 '12 at 14:41
show 6 more comments

(with apologies to Kerrek for using his answer as a starting point)

EDIT: Updated to handle types without any operator() at all.

#include <utility>

template <typename F, typename Arg>
struct Callable
{
private:
  static int tester[1];
  typedef char                      yes;
  typedef struct { char array[2]; } no;

  template <typename G, typename Brg>
  static char sfinae(decltype(std::declval<G>()(std::declval<Brg>())) (G::*pfn)(Brg)) { return 0; }

  template <typename G, typename Brg>
  static char sfinae(decltype(std::declval<G>()(std::declval<Brg>())) (G::*pfn)(Brg) const) { return 0; }

  template <typename G, typename Brg>
  static yes test(int (&a)[sizeof(sfinae<G,Brg>(&G::operator()))]);

  template <typename G, typename Brg>
  static no test(...);

public:
  static bool const value = sizeof(test<F, Arg>(tester)) == sizeof(yes);
};

struct Foo
{
  int operator()(int &) { return 1; }

};

struct Bar
{
  int operator()(int const &) { return 2; }
};

struct Wazz
{
  int operator()(int const &) const { return 3; }
};

struct Frob
{
  int operator()(int &) { return 4; }
  int operator()(int const &) const { return 5; }
};

struct Blip
{
  template<typename T>
  int operator()(T) { return 6; }
};

struct Boom
{

};

struct Zap
{
  int operator()(int) { return 42; }
};

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
  std::cout << "Foo(const int &):  " << Callable<Foo,  int const &>::value << std::endl
            << "Foo(int &):        " << Callable<Foo,  int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Bar(const int &):  " << Callable<Bar,  const int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Bar(int &):        " << Callable<Bar,  int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Zap(const int &):  " << Callable<Zap , const int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Zap(int&):         " << Callable<Zap , int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Wazz(const int &): " << Callable<Wazz, const int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Wazz(int &):       " << Callable<Wazz, int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Frob(const int &): " << Callable<Frob, const int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Frob(int &):       " << Callable<Frob, int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Blip(const int &): " << Callable<Blip, const int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Blip(int &):       " << Callable<Blip, int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Boom(const int &): " << Callable<Boom, const int &>::value << std::endl
            << "Boom(int&):        " << Callable<Boom, int &>::value << std::endl;
}

Demo: http://ideone.com/T3Iry

share|improve this answer
    
It, interestingly, also works for a operator()(int): ideone.com/egvJl. Well done, +1. :) –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 4:27
    
@Xeo: Oh wait, but this breaks it :( –  Ben Voigt Jan 18 '12 at 4:41
    
I have an idea how to fix that, gimme a sec. –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 4:45
2  
It's interesting to note that GCC 4.5.1 reports 0 for the overloaded cases when using variadic templates. Testing with Clang 3.1 however confirms that everything is indeed OK, reporting 1 for the overloaded cases. FWIW, I got a version together that works with function pointers. Note the problem with overloads in the variadic version here. It works correctly with Clang 3.1. –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 5:28
1  
@Xeo: You should make that an answer, it's much more powerful than mine. –  Ben Voigt Jan 18 '12 at 5:49
show 10 more comments

Here's something I hacked up which may or may not be what you need; it does seem to give true (false) for (const) int &...

#include <utility>

template <typename F, typename Arg>
struct Callable
{
private:
  typedef char                      yes;
  typedef struct { char array[2]; } no;

  template <typename G, typename Brg>
  static yes test(decltype(std::declval<G>()(std::declval<Brg>())) *);

  template <typename G, typename Brg>
  static no test(...);

public:
  static bool const value = sizeof(test<F, Arg>(nullptr)) == sizeof(yes);
};

struct Foo
{
  int operator()(int &) { return 1; }
  // int operator()(int const &) const { return 2; } // enable and compare
};

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
  std::cout << "Foo(const int &): " << Callable<Foo, int const &>::value << std::endl
            << "Foo(int &):       " << Callable<Foo, int &>::value << std::endl
    ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting solution. The problem is, if Foo looks like this,struct Foo { int operator()(const int &) const { return 2; } };, then Callable<Foo, int &>::value is 1. I expected 0. –  keveman Jan 18 '12 at 3:24
add comment

Something like this maybe? It's a bit round about to make it work on VS2010.

template<typename FPtr>
struct function_traits_impl;

template<typename R, typename A1>
struct function_traits_impl<R (*)(A1)>
{
    typedef A1 arg1_type;
};

template<typename R, typename C, typename A1>
struct function_traits_impl<R (C::*)(A1)>
{
    typedef A1 arg1_type;
};

template<typename R, typename C, typename A1>
struct function_traits_impl<R (C::*)(A1) const>
{
    typedef A1 arg1_type;
};

template<typename T>
typename function_traits_impl<T>::arg1_type arg1_type_helper(T);

template<typename F>
struct function_traits
{
    typedef decltype(arg1_type_helper(&F::operator())) arg1_type;
};

template<typename F, typename Arg>
struct is_callable : public std::is_same<typename function_traits<F>::arg1_type, const Arg&>
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work if the class has more than one operator() overloads. –  keveman Jan 18 '12 at 2:10
add comment

Here is a possible solution that utilizes an extra test to see if your template is being instantiated with a const T&:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<typename F, typename Arg>
struct is_callable {
private:

  template<typename>
  static char (&test(...))[2];

  template<bool, unsigned value>
  struct helper {};

  template<unsigned value>
  struct helper<true, value> {
    typedef void *type;
  };

  template<typename T>
  struct is_const_ref {};

  template<typename T>
  struct is_const_ref<T&> {
    static const bool value = false;
  };

  template<typename T>
  struct is_const_ref<const T&> {
    static const bool value = true;
  };

  template<typename UVisitor>
  static char test(typename helper<is_const_ref<Arg>::value, 
                                   sizeof(std::declval<UVisitor>()(std::declval<Arg>()), 0)>::type);
public:
  static const bool value = (sizeof(test<F>(0)) == sizeof(char));
};

struct foo {
  void operator()(const int &) {}
};

int main(void)
{
  cout << is_callable<foo, int &>::value << "\n";
  cout << is_callable<foo, const int &>::value << "\n";

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
But then you'll need a special case for volatile. And one for volatile const. –  Ben Voigt Jan 18 '12 at 4:23
    
Would those need to evaluate to false or true? ... The OP didn't specify ... –  Jason Jan 18 '12 at 4:38
    
It depends on the operator() declaration in the passed-in functor, I suppose... –  Ben Voigt Jan 18 '12 at 4:40
add comment

Ran across this while doing something else, was able to adapt my code to fit. It has the same features (and limitations) as @Xeo, but does not need sizeof trick/enable_if. The default parameter takes the place of needing to do the enable_if to handle template functions. I tested it under g++ 4.7 and clang 3.2 using the same test code Xeo wrote up

#include <type_traits>
#include <functional>

namespace detail {
  template<typename T, class Args, class Enable=void>
  struct call_exact : std::false_type {};

  template<class...Args> struct ARGS { typedef void type; };

  template<class T, class ... Args, class C=T>
  C * opclass(decltype(std::declval<T>()(std::declval<Args>()...)) (C::*)(Args...)) { }
  template<class T, class ... Args, class C=T>
  C * opclass(decltype(std::declval<T>()(std::declval<Args>()...)) (C::*)(Args...) const) { }

  template<typename T, class ... Args>
  struct call_exact<T, ARGS<Args...>,
    typename ARGS<
       decltype(std::declval<T&>()(std::declval<Args>()...)),
       decltype(opclass<T, Args...>(&T::operator()))
     >::type
   > : std::true_type {};
}

template<class T, class ... Args>
struct Callable : detail::call_exact<T, detail::ARGS<Args...>> { };

template<typename R, typename... FArgs, typename... Args>
struct Callable<R(*)(FArgs...), Args...>
 : Callable<std::function<R(FArgs...)>, Args...>{};
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