Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table Tran with transaction records.

I have two tables, Parameters1 and Parameters2, which are used to filter results when selecting from the Tran table a la:

SELECT *  
FROM  
     Tran t JOIN  
     Parameters1 p1 ON T.code1 = p1.code1  
     Parameters2 p2 ON T.code2 = p2.code2  
WHERE p1.code1 is not null AND
      p2.code2 is not null

Sometimes Parameters1 or Parameters2 is empty.

What I want is for the filtering to happen only if the Parameters tables have records. In other words, if Parameters1 is empty, don't use it to filter, and vice versa. Same goes for Parameters2.

I'm stumped.

share|improve this question
1  
Did you mean, SELECT t.* FROM Tran t JOIN... In other words, when the parameter tables are empt,y do you still want to project their attributes in the resulset? –  onedaywhen Jan 18 '12 at 9:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'd normally do this using dynamic SQL, since coding up dynamic search conditions with static SQL is generally hackish. If you are interested in this approach I highly recommend Erland Sommarskog's page on dynamic SQL for SQL Server 2005. He has a great case study with plenty of example code on how to do exactly what you're asking for.

1. Setup

Whether you use dynamic or static SQL, you should first determine upfront what filters apply:

DECLARE @p1_filter BIT;
DECLARE @p2_filter BIT;

SET @p1_filter = 0;
SET @p2_filter = 0;

IF EXISTS (SELECT TOP (1) * FROM Parameters1)
BEGIN
   SET @p1_filter = 1;
END;

IF EXISTS (SELECT TOP (1) * FROM Parameters2)
BEGIN
   SET @p2_filter = 1;
END;

2.a. Dynamic SQL

If you're going the dynamic SQL route you'd then do:

DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX);

SET @sql = 'SELECT * FROM Tran T ';

IF (@p1_filter = 1)
BEGIN
   SET @sql = @sql + 'INNER JOIN Parameters1 p1 ON T.code1 = p1.code1 ';
END;

IF (@p2_filter = 1)
BEGIN
   SET @sql = @sql + 'INNER JOIN Parameters2 p2 ON T.code2 = p2.code2 ';
END;

EXECUTE sp_executesql
   @statement = @sql
;

2.b.i. Static SQL: Sub-SELECTs in the WHERE clause

Otherwise, you'd continue with this ugly (and probably poorly performing) static SQL:

SELECT *
FROM Tran T
WHERE 
   (
         T.code1 IN (SELECT code1 FROM Parameters1)
      OR (@p1_filter = 0)
   )
   AND
   (
         T.code2 IN (SELECT code2 FROM Parameters2)
      OR (@p2_filter = 0)
   )
;

Erland also presents static SQL approaches like this one on that same page I referred to earlier. You may find a better approach there.

2.b.ii. Static SQL: LEFT OUTER JOIN

You can also go with this approach, which you proposed in the comments on this answer:

SELECT *
FROM 
                   Tran T
   LEFT OUTER JOIN Parameters1 p1
      ON T.code1 = p1.code1
   LEFT OUTER JOIN Parameters2 p2
      ON T.code2 = p2.code2
WHERE
       T.code1 = 
          CASE
             WHEN @p1_filter = 1
                THEN p1.code1
             ELSE T.code1
          END
   AND T.code2 =
          CASE
             WHEN @p2_filter = 1
                THEN p2.code2
             ELSE T.code2
          END
;
share|improve this answer
    
The first suggestion you have (determining the filters first) is the approach I will have to go with I think. I was hoping for something a little more elegant but it is what it is. –  richard Jan 18 '12 at 6:58
1  
One change though...I will left outer join the parameter tables, and then use the bit to determine, with a CASE statement, whether to filter on that table or not, like WHERE t.Code1 = CASE WHEN @p1_filter = 1 THEN p1.Code1 ELSE t.Code1 END. –  richard Jan 18 '12 at 7:01
    
@RichardDesLonde - Note that the first block of code in my answer is just the setup. You then follow it immediately with either the second or third block, depending on what approach you want to take. –  Nick Chammas Jan 18 '12 at 7:01
1  
"dynamic search conditions with static SQL is generally hackish" -- funny, I think that this is the norm and that it is dynamic SQL that is hackish ;) –  onedaywhen Jan 18 '12 at 9:47
1  
@RichardDesLonde - You're welcome. It was a good SQL problem. –  Nick Chammas Jan 18 '12 at 20:57

Try using RIGHT JOIN:

SELECT * FROM Tran T  
RIGHT JOIN Parameters1 p1 ON T.code1 = p1.code1  
JOIN Parameters2 p2 ON T.code2 = p2.code2  
WHERE p1.code1 is not null AND p2.code2 is not null  
share|improve this answer
    
That's the same problem, only in reverse. –  richard Jan 18 '12 at 2:12

How about the exists

select * from Tran t

where exists(select 1 from Parameters1 p1 where t.code1 = p.code1)

and  exists(select 1 from Parameters2 p2 where t.code2 = p.code2)
share|improve this answer
    
Closer...but I need an AND if both tables have records... –  richard Jan 18 '12 at 2:22
    
OK , I have updated. –  shenhengbin Jan 18 '12 at 2:34
    
It needs to be OR in cases where one or the other of the tables is empty...that's the problem... –  richard Jan 18 '12 at 2:39

I'm not sure I fully understand what you are trying to achieve. Do you only want results if BOTH have results? Also, I'm guessing that the p referred to in your joins is supposed to be the table alias for parameter1 (p1) and parameter2 (p2) and not just (p) as in your question.

If so, then just select t.* and LEFT JOIN both of the Parameters tables such as;

SELECT t.*  
FROM  
     Tran t 
     LEFT JOIN Parameters1 p1 ON T.code1 = p1.code1  
     LEFT JOIN Parameters2 p2 ON T.code2 = p2.code2  
WHERE p1.code1 is not null AND
      p2.code2 is not null
share|improve this answer
    
Problem here is, if either table returns no records, this query will return no records either. –  richard Jan 18 '12 at 5:34
    
Are you sure? Try with the SELECT changed to SELECT t.code1, t.code2, p1.code1 or p2.code2. The SELECT above should translate to SELECT ALL trans t and any matching parameters will be included, otherwise they'll have null values. INNER JOINS will only return if there is a match, LEFT JOINS should return a valid value if there is a match or NULL if there isn't (which is what you are trying to achieve I think). Try it out. –  Mr Moose Jan 18 '12 at 6:03
1  
I believe the Richard wants to filter out records from Tran by means of the INNER JOIN when either of the Parameters tables have records. Using a LEFT OUTER JOIN negates that purpose, since all the rows from Tran will always be returned. –  Nick Chammas Jan 18 '12 at 6:07
1  
From the original question: "What I want is for the filtering to happen only if the Parameters tables have records." In your case, if both Parameters tables are empty then no records from Tran will be returned, instead of all records as the OP wants. –  Nick Chammas Jan 18 '12 at 6:22
1  
I'm afraid even that is not enough. The OP wants to be able to filter on either Parameters table, on both, or on neither, depending on which of them have or don't have rows. I don't see how you can accomplish that with a LEFT OUTER JOIN and these WHERE conditions. –  Nick Chammas Jan 18 '12 at 6:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.