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I put together a simple script that pulls the product name, category name and product id from two tables. Then I take that data and use it to create a page title that's better than what I currently have for SEO purposes. For some reason I didn't think it would take as long as it's taking to run. There are 7k products.

My hosting company does allow the creation of a custom php.ini so I was able to override the 30 second time limit and changed it to 6000. But still the script times out. So I thought my script my suck. :)

Below is the script. Is there a better way I could write this so it doesn't time out? Or is what I'm trying to do just going to take some time and I need to write the script to do one category at a time?

<?php
// Make a MySQL Connection
mysql_connect("localhost", "myusername", "mypassword") or die(mysql_error());
mysql_select_db("mydatabase") or die(mysql_error());

$result = mysql_query("SELECT isc_products.prodcode, isc_products.prodname, isc_categories.catname FROM isc_products, isc_categories WHERE isc_products.prodcatids = isc_categories.categoryid") 
or die(mysql_error());


while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)){
$pname = mysql_real_escape_string($row['prodname']);
$catname = mysql_real_escape_string($row['catname']);
$sitename = Sitename;
$prodcode = $row['prodcode'];
$result2 = mysql_query("UPDATE isc_products SET prodpagetitle = '$pname - $catname - $sitename' WHERE prodcode = '$prodcode'") 
or die(mysql_error());
}

?>

indexes

Thanks, your help is appreciated. :)

Thanks SO much everyone! I really appreciate the quick responses. I can't believe I overlooked something so simple as running a direct query against the database (without php). Geez... Thanks again!

share|improve this question
    
Since you are selecting so many rows, try using something like Navicat to run the query directly (instead of via php) to deteremine if the database is the bottle neck. –  F21 Jan 18 '12 at 2:28
    
To start with are you using indexes on the database? That makes all the difference. –  Frankie Jan 18 '12 at 2:28
    
You don't need to mysql_real_escape_string data you got from mysql. Also I don't see your sitename constant? You also don't need to do this, you can update mysql data from selected rows, without even using PHP electrictoolbox.com/article/mysql/cross-table-update –  Steven Jan 18 '12 at 2:30
    
I'm not sure about indexes, my site is running the Interspire Shopping Cart and I'm trying to create new page titles from information already collected for each product. I needed the mysql escape function because my product titles have special characters that need to be escaped. I kept getting an error about the special characters otherwise. –  Tsanders Jan 18 '12 at 2:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just run

UPDATE isc_products
INNER JOIN isc_categories ON isc_products.prodcatids = isc_categories.categoryid
SET isc_products.prodpagetitle=CONCAT(isc_products.prodname,' - ',isc_categories.catname,' - $sitename');

If it times out, your DB is fishy (missing indices?)

share|improve this answer
    
So if I ran this say in PhpMySQL would this affect all items records in the table? I see what you are all saying. I think I got stuck in one mode (doing php scripts) because I'm fairly new at this. –  Tsanders Jan 18 '12 at 3:14
    
UPDATE runs over all rows fulfilling the WHERE clause - since we don't have one, UPDATE runs over ALL records - the same way as a SELECT can give you many rows with one query, an UPDATE can update many rows with one query. –  Eugen Rieck Jan 18 '12 at 3:16
    
I understand now. Thank you so much! I was overlooking the simple act of running a single query in phpmyadmin. –  Tsanders Jan 18 '12 at 3:18
    
wouldn't I need to keep the WHERE clause I have in my original to check on the product id? I thought it would need to do that to make sure it ads the right name to the right record. Would that no longer be an issue when run directly? –  Tsanders Jan 18 '12 at 3:20
    
You don't really care about the prodcode: You just used it, to link your first query (SELECT) with your thousands of secondary queries. Now that we only have one query left, we dont need this vehicle any longer. The Info in prodpagetitle comes from the products table itself (so it is allways the correct one) and the categories table (which is connected via INNER JOIN, so allways the correct one again) –  Eugen Rieck Jan 18 '12 at 3:24

You can just use one query to do what you want.

UPDATE ssc_products, isc_categories 
SET psc_products.prodpagetitle = CONCAT_WS(' - ',  isc_products.prodname, isc_categories.catname, $sitename)
WHERE isc_products.prodcatids = isc_categories.categoryid;
share|improve this answer

Can you show your tables(s) structure? Its important when dealing with that many products, indexing is key. Also (while) loop is bad here, it will effect performance. Like the guys mention above 1 query should do the trick.

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I'm not sure why you're doing this in PHP, given that you could achieve this with a single UPDATE. Perhaps you've left out bits that do things like identify which records have already been changed?

So I'll assume you really do want to do this in PHP, and that you just want to run this script once in order to update the prodpagetitle field table-wide.

One option would be to split this into separate scripts. Have a main script that does the SELECT, then skips through the UPDATEs by calling a second script, with the data to use in variables in the GET. For example:

<?php
// Make a MySQL Connection
mysql_connect("localhost", "myusername", "mypassword") or die(mysql_error());
mysql_select_db("mydatabase") or die(mysql_error());

$result = mysql_query("SELECT isc_products.prodcode, isc_products.prodname, isc_categories.catname FROM isc_products, isc_categories WHERE isc_products.prodcatids = isc_categories.categoryid") 
or die(mysql_error());

while ($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
  $pname = mysql_real_escape_string($row['prodname']);
  $catname = mysql_real_escape_string($row['catname']);
  $sitename = Sitename;
  $title=sprintf("%s - %s - %s", $pname, $catname, $sitename);
  $url=sprintf("http://example.com/update.php?pcode=%s&title=%s", $row['prodcode'], $title);
  $junk=file_get_contents($url)
}

?>

and:

<?php

// This is update.php, called by the script above.
mysql_connect("localhost", "myusername", "mypassword") or die(mysql_error());
mysql_select_db("mydatabase") or die(mysql_error());

$qfmt="UPDATE isc_products SET prodpagetitle = '%s' WHERE prodcode='%s'";
mysql_query(sprintf($qfmt, $_GET['pcode'], urldecode($_GET['title']));

?>

Node that this should be considered EXAMPLE code. I haven't tested it and don't plan to. You probably want to include some facility to mark your already-changed fields, so that you can continue on from whence you left off if the new script also times out (which it probably will). This script contains vulnerabilities, and should only be run in a secure environment or with significant modification to make it safe. </fineprint>

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