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I was trying to write a program that would display the prime numbers between 2 and 200.

This is the program that i wrote.

liste = [ ]
liste.append(2)
liste = [2]

for primeCandidate in range (2,10):
    isPrime = True
    for divisor in range (2,primeCandidate):
        if primeCandidate % divisor == 0:
            isPrime = False
            break
        if isPrime:
            liste.append(primeCandidate)
            print(liste)

But I always get a wrong output. And I couldn't find my mistakes. Can you help me finding my mistakes?

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2  
****for primeCandidate in range (2,200): –  Ekrem Ipek Jan 18 '12 at 3:49
    
What output are you getting? –  Andrew Cooper Jan 18 '12 at 3:56
    
What output are you getting? Also, note that it's unnecessary to test every value from 2 to the primeCandidate. You only need to test odd integers <= sqrt(primeCandidate). –  Joel Cornett Jan 18 '12 at 3:58
    
The wrong output i get is : [2, 3] [2, 3, 5] [2, 3, 5, 5] [2, 3, 5, 5, 5] [2, 3, 5, 5, 5, 7] [2, 3, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7] [2, 3, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 7] [2, 3, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 7, 7] [2, 3, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7] [2, 3, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 9] –  Ekrem Ipek Jan 18 '12 at 4:04
    
Look Ma, one line! [x for x in xrange(2,200) if all(x % n for n in xrange(2,x))] –  wim Jan 18 '12 at 4:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two things leap out:

(1) You don't need to set liste to [2] at the start; your primeCandidate loop includes 2, so you'll get 2 twice if you do.

(2) Your "if isPrime" is one level too deep. You can only trust isPrime after you've checked the candidate divisors. (Well, you're actually checking more than you need, but that's only an efficiency issue, not a bug.) To be specific:

liste = []
for primeCandidate in range (2,100):
    isPrime = True
    for divisor in range (2,primeCandidate):
        if primeCandidate % divisor == 0:
            isPrime = False
            break
    if isPrime:
        liste.append(primeCandidate)
        print(liste)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot ! Now the output is correct. The only problem is the output looks like this [2] [2, 3] [2, 3, 5] [2, 3, 5, 7] [2, 3, 5, 7, 11] [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13] [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17] [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19] And so on till 97. The output i want is : [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97] How can i get this ? –  Ekrem Ipek Jan 18 '12 at 4:00
2  
@EkremIpek: Again, move the print(liste) out two levels so that it lines up with the first for. You only want to print the list once after you have checked all the candidates. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 18 '12 at 4:04
    
Thanks a lot. That solved this problem. I've started programming last week. Thats why im making that silly mistakes :D –  Ekrem Ipek Jan 18 '12 at 4:08
from math import sqrt


def isPrime(num) :
    if num in [2,  3 ] : return True
    elif num < 2: return False 
    for i in [2]  +  range(3, int(sqrt(num)),  2) :
        if not num % i: return False 
    return True 

liste = [i for i in range(2,  201) if isPrime(i)] 

Note: In Python 3.x, range() returns a range object, not a list, therefore you would have to change

for i in [2] + range(3, int(sqrt(num)), 2):

to

for i in [2] + list(range(3, int(sqrt(num)), 2)):

to avoid the resulting TypeError.

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I corrected my mistake and now it works. Thanks anyways :) –  Ekrem Ipek Jan 18 '12 at 4:53
    
TypeError: can only concatenate list (not "range") to list –  groovehunter Jun 30 '13 at 12:22
    
@groovehunter: In Python 3.x, range() returns a range object, whereas in Python 2, range() returns a list. I've added a note in my answer as well. –  Joel Cornett Jul 1 '13 at 16:04

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