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I knew that a lot of people got this error before, but I just started programming with C++, so I'm not really sure about most of the commands yet.

I am trying to create a program with the following source code:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
char input[7];

std::cout << "Enter your gender (male or female):";
std::cin.getline (input, 6);

if (input == "male")
char reply[] = "Mr";

else
char reply[] = "Mrs";

std::cout << "Hello " << reply << "!\n";

return 0;
}

Now when I tried to compile this with my compiler (G++). I received this error:

StringTest.cpp: In function 'int main()':
StringTest.cpp: 16:26: error: 'reply' was not declared in this scope

Can you please tell me what exactly went wrong with my code? And how should I attempts to solve it?

Thank you, Xarlexus

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4 Answers 4

It's a bit clearer if you add the (optional) braces:

if (input == "male")
{
    char reply[] = "Mr";
}
else
{
    char reply[] = "Mrs";
}

std::cout << "Hello " << reply << "!\n";

reply ceases to exist at the } that ends the block in which it is declared. So, here, reply does not exist when you try to print it.

The solution here is to declare reply outside of the blocks, then assign to it from within the blocks:

char const* reply(0);

if (input == "male")
{
    reply = "Mr";
}
else
{
    reply = "Mrs";
}

std::cout << "Hello " << reply << "!\n";

This way, reply is still in scope (and still exists) on the last line when you print it.


Note, however, that while your program may now compile, it is still incorrect. input == "male" does not do what you think: input and "male" become pointers to C strings and the pointers are compared, not the contents of the pointed-to strings. You need to use a string comparison function, or better yet, use std::string, which overloads == to have string comparison semantics.

A cleaner, correcter version of your program might look like so:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::string input;

    std::cout << "Enter your gender (male or female):" << std::endl;

    if (!std::getline(std::cin, input))
    {
        std::cout << "Oops, something bad happened during input!" << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }

    std::string reply;
    if (input == "male")
    {
        reply = "Mr";
    }
    else if (input == "female")
    {
        reply = "Mrs";
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "Your selection was invalid" << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }

    std::cout << "Hello " << reply << "!" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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@Xarlexus: You can't, at least not directly. reply is of type const char[3] or const char[4]; it can't simultaneously be both. You can make it a const char* rather than an array (which means sizeof reply gives you the size of a pointer, not the size of the array). Or, since you're programming in C++, you can use std::string, which is more robust and flexible. –  Keith Thompson Jan 18 '12 at 4:24
    
@KeithThompson, Hmm, I thinks I understand now about how reply can't be both const char[3] and const char[4]. Thanks for replying. –  Xarlexus Jan 18 '12 at 4:40

reply exists locally within the scope of the if/else blocks. To access it outside of them, you must declare it outside of that scope.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
int main()
{
  std::string input;

  std::cout << "Enter your gender (male or female):";
  stdgetline(cin, input);

  std::string reply;
  if (input == "male") {
    reply = "Mr";
  }
  else {
    reply = "Mrs";
  }
  std::cout << "Hello " << reply << "!\n";

  return 0;
}

Note that this snippet in your original code doesn't do what you expect: if (input == "male"). You're comparing pointers, when you intend to compare strings. Preferably use std::string or even strcmp.

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There is an implicit block in each if/else statement so your code reads:

if (input == "male") {
   char reply[] = "Mr";
} else {
   char reply[] = "Mrs";
}

//  reply is not defined in this scope

What you really want is something that's more like this:

const char *reply;

if (input == "male")
  reply = "Mr";
else 
  reply = "Mrs";

Though I would personally write it like this:

const char * reply = (input == "male") ? "Mr" : "Mrs";

Also note that I would use const char * instead of the char [] since I assume that the typical use is as an immutable string rather than a char[] which is mutable.

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input == "male is a meaningless comparision, since it will never be true. input is an array, and will decay to a pointer to the first element. From there on, it's pointer comparision (i.e., are input and "male" at the same address?), which just will not be true.

You want a std::string instead:

#include <iostream>
#include <string> // <== add this

int main()
{
  std::string input; // <== change type of 'input'

  std::cout << "Enter your gender (male or female):";
  std::getline(std::cout, input); // <== use free function version

  char const* reply;
  if (input == "male") { // <== now does the correct comparision
    reply = "Mr";
  }
  else {
    reply = "Mrs";
  }
  std::cout << "Hello " << reply << "!\n";

  return 0;
}
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