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What's the difference between:

char * const 

and

const char *
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2  
I'm pretty sure that const * char isn't going to compile, at least not in C... –  ahockley May 20 '09 at 22:18
2  
const = 5; char = 4; if ((const * char) == 20) puts("20"); //;-> –  jrcs3 May 20 '09 at 22:23
9  
Did you mean "char * const and const char *"? –  Andrew Coleson May 20 '09 at 22:23

10 Answers 10

up vote 102 down vote accepted

The difference is that const char * is a pointer to a const char, while char * const is a constant pointer to a char.

The first, the value being pointed to can't be changed but the pointer can be. The second, the value being pointed at can change but the pointer can't (similar to a reference).

There is also a

const char * const

which is a constant pointer to a constant char (so nothing about it can be changed).

Note:

The following two forms are equivalent:

const char *

and

char const *

The exact reason for this is described in the C++ standard, but it's important to note and avoid the confusion. I know several coding standards that prefer:

char const

over

const char

(with or without pointer) so that the placement of the const element is the same as with a pointer const.

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Would it be worthwhile to note what happens if multiple variables are specified in the same declaration? I believe const int *foo,*bar; would declare both foo and bar to be int const *, but int const *foo, *bar would declare foo to be a int const * and bar to be int *. I think typedef int * intptr; const intptr foo,bar; would declare both variables to be int * const; I don't know any way to use a combined declaration to create two variables of that type without a typedef. –  supercat Apr 12 '13 at 21:57
    
@supercat I believe const int *foo,*bar; would declare both foo and bar to be int const *: Yes. but int const *foo, *bar would declare foo to be a int const * and bar to be int *: No! It would be exactly the same as the previous case. (See ideone.com/RsaB7n where you get the same error for both foo and bar). I think typedef int * intptr; const intptr foo,bar; would declare both variables to be int * const: Yes. I don't know any way to use a combined declaration to create two variables of that type without a typedef: Well, int *const foo, *const bar;. C declarator syntax... –  gx_ Aug 28 '13 at 18:35
    
@gx_: So I was wrong--my uncertainty was why I suggested that it might be helpful to say what the rules are. What would int const *foo, *volatile bar do to bar? Make it both const and volatile? I miss Pascal's clean separation of declared-variable names and their types (a pointer to an array of pointers to integers would be var foo: ^Array[3..4] of ^Integer;`. That'd be some funny nested parenthesized thing in C, I think. –  supercat Aug 28 '13 at 18:54
    
@supercat (oh, C-only, sorry for the C++ code link, I got here from a C++ question) It's all about the C declaration syntax, with a ("pure") type part followed by a declarator. In "int const *foo, *volatile bar" the type part is int const (stops before the *) and the declarators are *foo (the expression *foo will denote an int const) and *volatile bar; reading right-to-left (good rule for cv-qualifiers), foo is a pointer to a const int, and bar is a volatile pointer to a const int (the pointer itself is volatile, the pointed int is [accessed as] const). –  gx_ Aug 28 '13 at 21:23
    
@supercat And as for "a pointer to an array of pointers to integers" (I don't know Pascal, not sure about the [3..4] syntax, so let's take an array of 10 elements): int *(*foo)[10];. It mirrors its (future) use as an expression: *(*foo)[i] (with i an integer in the range [0, 10) i.e. [0, 9]) will first dereference foo to get at the array, then access the element at index i (because postfix [] binds tighter than prefix *), then dereference this element, finally yielding an int (see ideone.com/jgjIjR ). But typedef makes it easier (see ideone.com/O3wb7d ). –  gx_ Aug 28 '13 at 21:25

To avoid confusion, always append the const qualifier.

int       *      mutable_pointer_to_mutable_int;
int const *      mutable_pointer_to_constant_int;
int       *const constant_pointer_to_mutable_int;
int const *const constant_pointer_to_constant_int;
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1  
Why? "To avoid confusion" doesn't explain what the confusion is to me. –  Andrew Weir Nov 20 '13 at 11:48
1  
@Andrew: I was hinting at consistency and thus readability. Writing all type qualifiers so they modify what's on their left, always, is what I use. –  diapir Nov 20 '13 at 14:31
    
Gotcha. Thanks. –  Andrew Weir Nov 20 '13 at 16:51
    
I find this answer super confusing, lol. –  alex gray Apr 19 at 23:32
    
Actually it's the best answer on the subject I've found in SO –  Trap Apr 22 at 15:51

const * char is invalid C code and is meaningless. Perhaps you meant to ask the difference between a const char * and a char const *, or possibly the difference between a const char * and a char * const?

See also:

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1  
++for referencing existing questions. I added another... –  Shog9 May 20 '09 at 22:34

const always modifies the thing that comes before it (to the left of it), EXCEPT when it's the first thing in a type declaration, where it modifies the thing that comes after it (to the right of it).

So these two are the same:

int const *i1;
const int *i2;

they define pointers to a const int. You can change where i1 and i2 points, but you can't change the value they point at.

This:

int *const i3 = (int*) 0x12345678;

defines a const pointer to an integer and initializes it to point at memory location 12345678. You can change the int value at address 12345678, but you can't change the address that i3 points to.

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const char* is a pointer to a constant character
char* const is a constant pointer to a character
const char* const is a constant pointer to a constant character

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1) const char* x Here X is basically a character pointer which is pointing to a constant value

2) char* const x is refer to character pointer which is constant, but the location it is pointing can be change.

3) const char* const x is combination to 1 and 2, means it is a constant character pointer which is pointing to constant value.

4) const *char x will cause a compiler error. it can not be declared.

5) char const * x is equal to point 1.

the rule of thumb is if const is with var name then the pointer will be constant but the pointing location can be changed , else pointer will point to a constant location and pointer can point to another location but the pointing location content can not be change.

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First one is a syntax error. Maybe you meant the difference between

const char * mychar

and

char * const mychar

In that case, the first one is a pointer to data that can't change, and the second one is a pointer that will always point to the same address.

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Another thumb rule is to check where const is:

  1. before * => value stored is constant
  2. after * => pointer itself is constant
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I presume you mean const char * and char * const .

The first, const char *, is a pointer to a constant character. The pointer itself is mutable.

The second, char * const is a constant pointer to a character. The pointer cannot change, the character it points to can.

And then there is const char * const where the pointer and character cannot change.

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Your first two are actually the same and your third is a compiler error :) –  workmad3 May 20 '09 at 22:22
    
Whoops, you are right. Fixed. –  Michael May 20 '09 at 22:23

Here is a detailed explanation with code

/*const char * p;
char * const p; 
const char * const p;*/ // these are the three conditions,

// const char *p;const char * const p; pointer value cannot be changed

// char * const p; pointer address cannot be changed

// const char * const p; both cannot be changed.

#include<stdio.h>

/*int main()
{
    const char * p; // value cannot be changed
    char z;
    //*p = 'c'; // this will not work
    p = &z;
    printf(" %c\n",*p);
    return 0;
}*/

/*int main()
{
    char * const p; // address cannot be changed
    char z;
    *p = 'c'; 
    //p = &z;   // this will not work
    printf(" %c\n",*p);
    return 0;
}*/



/*int main()
{
    const char * const p; // both address and value cannot be changed
    char z;
    *p = 'c'; // this will not work
    p = &z; // this will not work
    printf(" %c\n",*p);
    return 0;
}*/
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@reese moore Thank you. –  Megharaj Apr 18 '13 at 6:48

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