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As an extension to this question here Linking JavaScript Libraries in User Controls I was after some examples of how people are concatenating and minifying JavaScript on the fly OR at build time. I would also like to see how it then works into your master pages.

I don't mind page specific files being minified and linked inidividually as they currently are (see below) but all the JavaScript files on the main master page (I have about 5 or 6) I would like concatenated and minified.

Bonus points for anyone who also incorporates CSS concatenation and minification! :-)

Current master page with the common JavaScript files that I would like concatenated and minified:

<%@ Master Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewMasterPage" %>
<head runat="server">
    ... BLAH ...
    <asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="AdditionalHead" runat="server" />
    ... BLAH ...
    <%= Html.CSSBlock("/styles/site.css") %>
    <%= Html.CSSBlock("/styles/jquery-ui-1.7.1.css") %>
    <%= Html.CSSBlock("/styles/jquery.lightbox-0.5.css") %>
    <%= Html.CSSBlock("/styles/ie6.css", 6) %>
    <%= Html.CSSBlock("/styles/ie7.css", 7) %>
    <asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="AdditionalCSS" runat="server" />
</head>
<body>
    ... BLAH ...
    <%= Html.JSBlock("/scripts/jquery-1.3.2.js", "/scripts/jquery-1.3.2.min.js") %>
    <%= Html.JSBlock("/scripts/jquery-ui-1.7.1.js", "/scripts/jquery-ui-1.7.1.min.js") %>
    <%= Html.JSBlock("/scripts/jquery.validate.js", "/scripts/jquery.validate.min.js") %>
    <%= Html.JSBlock("/scripts/jquery.lightbox-0.5.js", "/scripts/jquery.lightbox-0.5.min.js") %>
    <%= Html.JSBlock("/scripts/global.js", "/scripts/global.min.js") %>
    <asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="AdditionalJS" runat="server" />
</body>

Used in a page like this (which I'm happy with):

<asp:Content ID="signUpContent" ContentPlaceHolderID="AdditionalJS" runat="server">
    <%= Html.JSBlock("/scripts/pages/account.signup.js", "/scripts/pages/account.signup.min.js") %>
</asp:Content>


UPDATE: Recommendations for now (late 2013):

I would look at Microsoft ASP.NET's built in Bundling and Minification.

share|improve this question
    
Very interested to see what people are doing here. The port of YUI compress looks like the best place to start. –  Bayard Randel May 20 '09 at 22:26
1  
Anyone have any solutions using YUI? –  Charlino May 21 '09 at 21:42
    
Does something being the duck's nuts mean it's good or bad? –  Mark May 17 '13 at 14:50
    
It's good :-) Although this answer is probably outdated now... there are better buck nuts out there. –  Charlino May 17 '13 at 17:17
    
I have to ask if "duck's nuts" is acceptable... <g> –  Jonesome Oct 16 '13 at 15:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the appendix of Professional ASP.NET 3.5 Scott Hanselman talks about Packer for .NET. This will integrate with MSBuild and pack javascript files for production deployments etc.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks great, I'll have to give it a whirl. I've heard bad things about 'Packer' but I see it supports 'JSMin' too. –  Charlino May 20 '09 at 23:00
    
While that looks nice, one advantage that YUI Compress seems to have is that it does CSS compression and concatenation as well. –  Bayard Randel May 20 '09 at 23:51
    
Packer for .NET does do CSS concatenation and minifying as well - check out the link :-) But yeah, I do hear that YUI Compress does a better job than anything else at minifying JS & CSS. –  Charlino May 20 '09 at 23:58

Try this:

I’ve recently completed a fair bit of research and consequent development at work that goes quite far to improve the performance of our web application’s front-end. I thought I’d share the basic solution here.

The first obvious thing to do is benchmark your site using Yahoo’s YSlow and Google’s PageSpeed. These will highlight the "low-hanging fruit" performance improvements to make. Unless you’ve already done so, the resulting suggestions will almost certainly include combining, minifying and gzipping your static content.

The steps we’re going to perform are:

Write a custom HTTPHandler to combine and minify CSS. Write a custom HTTPHandler to combine and minify JS. Include a mechanism to ensure that the above only do their magic when the application is not in debug mode. Write a custom server-side web control to easily maintain css/js file inclusion. Enable GZIP of certain content types on IIS 6. Right, let’s start with CSSHandler.asax that implements the .NET IHttpHandler interface:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;
using System.Web;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    public class CssHandler : IHttpHandler
    {
        public bool IsReusable { get { return true; } }

        public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
        {
            string[] cssFiles = context.Request.QueryString["cssfiles"].Split(',');

            List<string> files = new List<string>();
            StringBuilder response = new StringBuilder();
            foreach (string cssFile in cssFiles)
            {
                if (!cssFile.EndsWith(".css", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
                {
                    //log custom exception
                    context.Response.StatusCode = 403;
                    return;
                }

                try
                {
                    string filePath = context.Server.MapPath(cssFile);
                    string css = File.ReadAllText(filePath);
                    string compressedCss = Yahoo.Yui.Compressor.CssCompressor.Compress(css);
                    response.Append(compressedCss);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    //log exception
                    context.Response.StatusCode = 500;
                    return;
                }
            }

            context.Response.Write(response.ToString());

            string version = "1.0"; //your dynamic version number 

            context.Response.ContentType = "text/css";
            context.Response.AddFileDependencies(files.ToArray());
            HttpCachePolicy cache = context.Response.Cache;
            cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.Public);
            cache.VaryByParams["cssfiles"] = true;
            cache.SetETag(version);
            cache.SetLastModifiedFromFileDependencies();
            cache.SetMaxAge(TimeSpan.FromDays(14));
            cache.SetRevalidation(HttpCacheRevalidation.AllCaches);
        }
    }
}

Ok, now some explanation:

IsReUsable property:

We aren’t dealing with anything instance-specific, which means we can safely reuse the same instance of the handler to deal with multiple requests, because our ProcessRequest is threadsafe. More info.

ProcessRequest method:

Nothing too hectic going on here. We’re looping through the CSS files given to us (see the CSSControl below for how they’re coming in) and compressing each one, using a .NET port of Yahoo’s YUICompressor, before adding the contents to the outgoing response stream.

The remainder of the method deals with setting up some HTTP caching properties to further optimise the way the browser client downloads (or not, as the case may be) content.

We set Etags in code so that they may be the same across all machines in our server farm. We set Response and Cache dependencies on our actual files so, should they be replaced, cache will be invalidated. We set Cacheability such that proxies can cache. We VaryByParams using our cssfiles attribute, so that we can cache per CSS file group submitted through the handler. And here is the CSSControl, a custom server-side control inheriting the .NET LiteralControl.

Front:

<customcontrols:csscontrol id="cssControl" runat="server">
  <CustomControls:Stylesheet File="main.css" />
  <CustomControls:Stylesheet File="layout.css" />
  <CustomControls:Stylesheet File="formatting.css" />
</customcontrols:csscontrol>

Back:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Linq;
using TTC.iTropics.Utilities;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    [DefaultProperty("Stylesheets")]
    [ParseChildren(true, "Stylesheets")]
    public class CssControl : LiteralControl
    {
        [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerDefaultProperty)]
        public List<Stylesheet> Stylesheets { get; set; }

        public CssControl()
        {
            Stylesheets = new List<Stylesheet>();
        }

        protected override void Render(HtmlTextWriter output)
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled)
            {
                const string format = "<link rel=\"Stylesheet\" href=\"stylesheets/{0}\"></link>";

                foreach (Stylesheet sheet in Stylesheets)
                    output.Write(format, sheet.File);
            }
            else
            {
                const string format = "<link type=\"text/css\" rel=\"Stylesheet\" href=\"stylesheets/CssHandler.ashx?cssfiles={0}&version={1}\"/>";
                IEnumerable<string> stylesheetsArray = Stylesheets.Select(s => s.File);
                string stylesheets = String.Join(",", stylesheetsArray.ToArray());
                string version = "1.00" //your version number

                output.Write(format, stylesheets, version);
            }

        }
    }

    public class Stylesheet
    {
        public string File { get; set; }
    }
}

HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled is hooked up to the following setting in your web.config:

<system.web>
  <compilation debug="false">
</system.web>

So, basically, if your site is in debug mode you get HTML markup like this:

<link rel="Stylesheet" href="stylesheets/formatting.css"></link>
<link rel="Stylesheet" href="stylesheets/layout.css"></link
<link rel="Stylesheet" href="stylesheets/main.css"></link>

But if you’re in production mode (debug=false), you’ll get markup like this:

<link type="text/css" rel="Stylesheet" href="CssHandler.ashx?cssfiles=main.css,layout.css,formatting.css&version=1.0"/>

The latter will then obviously invoke the CSSHandler, which will take care of combining, minifying and cache-readying your static CSS content.

All of the above can then also be duplicated for your static JavaScript content:

`JSHandler.ashx:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;
using System.Web;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    public class JSHandler : IHttpHandler
    {
        public bool IsReusable { get { return true; } }

        public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
        {
            string[] jsFiles = context.Request.QueryString["jsfiles"].Split(',');

            List<string> files = new List<string>();
            StringBuilder response = new StringBuilder();

            foreach (string jsFile in jsFiles)
            {
                if (!jsFile.EndsWith(".js", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
                {
                    //log custom exception
                    context.Response.StatusCode = 403;
                    return;
                }

                try
                {
                    string filePath = context.Server.MapPath(jsFile);
                    files.Add(filePath);
                    string js = File.ReadAllText(filePath);
                    string compressedJS = Yahoo.Yui.Compressor.JavaScriptCompressor.Compress(js);
                    response.Append(compressedJS);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    //log exception
                    context.Response.StatusCode = 500;
                    return;
                }
            }

            context.Response.Write(response.ToString());

            string version = "1.0"; //your dynamic version number here

            context.Response.ContentType = "application/javascript";
            context.Response.AddFileDependencies(files.ToArray());
            HttpCachePolicy cache = context.Response.Cache;
            cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.Public);
            cache.VaryByParams["jsfiles"] = true;
            cache.VaryByParams["version"] = true;
            cache.SetETag(version);
            cache.SetLastModifiedFromFileDependencies();
            cache.SetMaxAge(TimeSpan.FromDays(14));
            cache.SetRevalidation(HttpCacheRevalidation.AllCaches);
        }
    }
}

And its accompanying JSControl:

Front:

<customcontrols:JSControl ID="jsControl" runat="server">
  <customcontrols:Script File="jquery/jquery-1.3.2.js" />
  <customcontrols:Script File="main.js" />
  <customcontrols:Script File="creditcardpayments.js" />
</customcontrols:JSControl>

Back:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Linq;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    [DefaultProperty("Scripts")]
    [ParseChildren(true, "Scripts")]
    public class JSControl : LiteralControl
    {
        [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerDefaultProperty)]
        public List<Script> Scripts { get; set; }

        public JSControl()
        {
            Scripts = new List<Script>();
        }

        protected override void Render(HtmlTextWriter writer)
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled)
            {
                const string format = "<script src=\"scripts\\{0}\"></script>";

                foreach (Script script in Scripts)
                    writer.Write(format, script.File);
            }
            else
            {
                IEnumerable<string> scriptsArray = Scripts.Select(s => s.File);
                string scripts = String.Join(",", scriptsArray.ToArray());
                string version = "1.0" //your dynamic version number
                const string format = "<script src=\"scripts/JsHandler.ashx?jsfiles={0}&version={1}\"></script>";

                writer.Write(format, scripts, version);
            }
        }
    }

    public class Script
    {
        public string File { get; set; }
    }
}

Enabling GZIP:

As Jeff Atwood says, enabling Gzip on your web site server is a no-brainer. After some tracing, I decided to enable Gzip on the following file types:

.css .js .axd (Microsoft Javascript files) .aspx (Usual ASP.NET Web Forms content) .ashx (Our handlers) To enable HTTP Compression on your IIS 6.0 web server:

Open IIS, Right click Web Sites, Services tab, enable Compress Application Files and Compress Static Files Stop IIS Open up IIS Metabase in Notepad (C:\WINDOWS\system32\inetsrv\MetaBase.xml) – and make a back up if you’re nervous about these things Locate and overwrite the two IIsCompressionScheme and one IIsCompressionSchemes elements with the following:

And that’s it! This saved us heaps of bandwidth and resulted in a more responsive web application throughout.

Enjoy!

share|improve this answer
3  
Wow - that's an incredibly detailed response, definately worthy of a blog post somewhere! Definitely a good solution if it fits your website. With my website all the js and css that needs to be combined, is combined anyway so I don't really need such a complex solution. And yes, I've enabled gzip. Plus I've put far future expire headers and automatic versioning of my js & css files on a cookie free domain - but that's another question all together! –  Charlino May 5 '10 at 23:33
    
+1 for the longest answer I've seen this month! –  UpTheCreek Dec 2 '10 at 6:10
    
A few years later and the world has moved on, although I needed to re-solve this problem at my new employer. Hands down I would now advise using Cassette: getcassette.net –  Mark Gibaud Jan 13 at 23:02

Why not use the ScriptManager? Here's an MVCScriptManager that will combine AND squish.

share|improve this answer
1  
That looks like a great option for on the fly concatenation and minification. But I'm definitely swaying towards a build time solution. Much cleaner without the overhead, plus I can do CSS there while I'm at it :-) –  Charlino May 27 '09 at 9:32

Use either YUI Compressor or Dojo compressor. They both use the Rhino JS parsing engine which tokenizes your code, and will therefore only work if the code is valid code. If there is an error, they'll let you know (which is a nice bonus IMO!) Packer on the other hand, will pack your code even if it contains errors.

I use YUI in all my projects via build scripts. Never do it on the fly, it takes too long to do the compression. Both YUI and Dojo are Java based (ala Rhino) and if you do it on the fly, you'll be spawning background processes to generate the output - not good for performance. Always do it at build time.

share|improve this answer

Rejuicer is a great new minifier for ASP.NET that's getting a lot of buzz: http://rejuice.me

It is configured as a HTTP module & performs minification at run-time (once) and caches the output.

It:

  • Has a fluent interface for configuration
  • Allows you to specify files to minify with wildcard rules
  • Runs on Windows Azure
  • Somewhat magically turns itself off in development environments, so you can debug your original javascript code (not minified).

The configuration (done on ApplicationStart in global.asax.cs) is as simple as:

OnRequest.ForJs("~/Combined.js")
            .Compact
            .FilesIn("~/Scripts/")
              .Matching("*.js")
            .Cache
            .Configure();
share|improve this answer
    
The link to rejuice isn't working... –  theJerm Jul 18 at 21:15

Here's what I've used for concatenating, compressing and caching CSS and JS files: http://gist.github.com/130913

It just requires Yahoo.Yui.Compressor.dll in the bin directory. It doesn't compress at compile time, but the files are cached with a file dependency, so they are only loaded once, until they're changed.

Then I just add this code in the <head>:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/YuiCompressor.ashx?css=reset,style,etc" />

and this just before the </body>:

<script type="text/javascript" src="/YuiCompressor.ashx?js=main,other,etc"></script>

It's designed to work with multiple files all in the same path but could easily be upgraded to support different paths.

share|improve this answer

I use a customized solution based on MSBuild and the Microsoft Ajax Minifier. Much of the existing blog posts out there don't correctly handle certain cases such as integration with TFS build.

For each web project, we create a "wpp.targets" file to extend the Web Publishing Pipeline. For example, if the project is "Website.csproj" create a file named "Website.wpp.targets" in the project.

Place the following code in the targets file:

<Project DefaultTargets="Build" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath32)\PATH TO YOUR MSBUILD MINIFY TARGETS" />

  <!-- Hook up minification task to WPP build process -->
  <PropertyGroup>
    <OnAfterPipelineTransformPhase>
      $(OnAfterPipelineTransformPhase);
      MinifyResourceFiles;
    </OnAfterPipelineTransformPhase>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <!-- Define temporary location to store minified resources -->
  <PropertyGroup>
    <MinifyResourceIntermediateOutput Condition="'$(MinifyResourceIntermediateOutput)'==''">MinifyResourceFiles</MinifyResourceIntermediateOutput>
    <MinifyResourceIntermediateLocation Condition="'$(MinifyResourceIntermediateLocation)'==''">$(_WPPDefaultIntermediateOutputPath)$(MinifyResourceIntermediateOutput)</MinifyResourceIntermediateLocation>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <Target Name="MinifyResourceFiles" DependsOnTargets="PipelineCollectFilesPhase" Condition="'$(Configuration)' == 'Release'">
    <!-- Create lists of the resources to minify -->
    <!-- These extract all Javascript and CSS files from the publishing pipeline "FilesForPackagingFromProject" and create two new lists.
     The "MinifiedFile" metadata on each item contains the temporary location where the minified file will be stored -->
    <ItemGroup>
      <JavaScriptToMinify Include="@(FilesForPackagingFromProject)" 
                          Condition="'%(FilesForPackagingFromProject.Extension)' == '.js'">
        <MinifiedFile>$(MinifyResourceIntermediateLocation)\minified\%(DestinationRelativePath)</MinifiedFile>
      </JavaScriptToMinify>
      <StylesheetToMinify Include="@(FilesForPackagingFromProject)"
                          Condition="'%(FilesForPackagingFromProject.Extension)' == '.css'">
        <MinifiedFile>$(MinifyResourceIntermediateLocation)\minified\%(DestinationRelativePath)</MinifiedFile>
      </StylesheetToMinify>    
    </ItemGroup>

    <!-- Minify resources -->
    <!-- These commands should be replaced with the MSBuild Tasks used to perform your minification
         I use my own custom tasks based on the Microsoft Ajax Minifier DLL 
         The input of the minifier takes a source file directly from the project and outputs to a temporary location -->
    <MinifyJavaScript SourceFiles="@(JavaScriptToMinify)" DestinationFiles="@(JavaScriptToMinify->'%(MinifiedFile)')"
                      Comments="None" />
    <MinifyStylesheet SourceFiles="@(StylesheetToMinify)" DestinationFiles="@(StylesheetToMinify->'%(MinifiedFile)')"
                      Comments="None" />

    <!-- Remove the original source files from the packaging system and include the new minfied resources from the temporary location -->
    <ItemGroup>
      <!--Remove unminified resources from the pipeline -->
      <FilesForPackagingFromProject Remove="@(JavaScriptToMinify)" Condition="'@(JavaScriptToMinify)' != ''" />
      <FilesForPackagingFromProject Remove="@(StylesheetToMinify)" Condition="'@(StylesheetToMinify)' != ''" />
      <!--Add the minified resources at the new loction to the pipeline -->
      <FilesForPackagingFromProject Include="@(JavaScriptToMinify->'%(MinifiedFile)')" Condition="'@(JavaScriptToMinify)' != ''"/>
      <FilesForPackagingFromProject Include="@(StylesheetToMinify->'%(MinifiedFile)')" Condition="'@(StylesheetToMinify)' != ''"/>
    </ItemGroup>
  </Target>
</Project>

The "'$(Configuration') == 'Release'" condition on the minification target can be modified depending on your needs. It will automatically minify (and validate) all CSS and JS files in the project when publishing, packaging, and building on the server.

You may need to enable the WPP "CopyWebApplication" target for server builds. To do this, set the MSBuild property UseWP_CopyWebApplication to True, and PipelineDependsOnBuild to False. We set these in the project file, before the web application targets file is included.

share|improve this answer

I'd recommend http://www.RequestReduce.com which minimizes and combines css and javascript as well as sprites css background images and optimizes their PNG compression. It does all of this at run time and caches the output. It requires no code or configuration beyond adding the HttpModule. It serves all cached content with optimized far future headers and ETags to ensure that browsers cache the css/javascript/sprites as long as possible. While it requires no configuration, it is highly configurable and can be setup to run with a CDN and sync cached files accross a web farm.

All javascript, images and css are fetched via HTTP so it can include css and js from third parties and its also a great way to minify/combine .axd resources like WebResource.axd and ScriptResource.axd. It determines the presense of js and css via content-type so the target resource can have any (or no) extension. It runs on any IIS based technology including all versions and view engines of MVC, web forms and "web pages".

You can download from http://www.RequestReduce.com, Nuget or fork from https://github.com/mwrock/RequestReduce.

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