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This question has been asked several times already, but has been solved with poor implimentations.

A poor implimentation in my opinion is something that:

Uses a library like mootools or jquery

Uses some sort of delay in between requests like setTimeout("doNext()",3000);

Specifically what I am trying to achieve is this.

<div onClick="javascript:one();two();"></div>

one() and two() are AJAX

one() MUST come before two()

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call two inside one after getting response –  Dau Jan 18 '12 at 6:47
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

two(); has to be called in the success handler of the ajax in one(). E.g.:

html:

<div onClick="javascript:one();"></div>

javascript:

function one() {
    $.ajax({
        ...
        success: function() {
            setTimeout(two,3000);
        }
    });
}

function two() {
    $.ajax({
        ...
    });
}
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I don't understand how this answer got accepted if the OP wanted to avoid both jQuery and delays? –  Imp Apr 3 '12 at 16:27
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Try this !!!

function one() {
    $.ajax({
        ...
        aysnc:false,
    });
}

function two() {
    $.ajax({
        ...
        aysnc:false,
    });
}
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I agree with scessor that the second function should be executed within the first one - on success. Here is my AJAX function, without any jquery or else needed:

    function ajax_call_1(divId, params)
    {
        if (window.XMLHttpRequest){
            // code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
            xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
        }
        else{
            // code for IE6, IE5
            xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
        }

        xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function(){
            if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200){
                if(divId!='')
                    document.getElementById(divId).innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
                else{
                    // do something else
                }
                ajax_call_2('html_id', 'parameters_to_be_send')
            }
        }
        xmlhttp.open("POST", "script_url", true); //file
        xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
        xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-length", params.length); //length
        xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Connection", "close"); 
        xmlhttp.send(params); //parameters
    }

And the second function is the same, but without a function call on success:

        function ajax_call_2(divId, params)
        {
            if (window.XMLHttpRequest){
                // code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
                xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
            }
            else{
                // code for IE6, IE5
                xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
            }

            xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function(){
                if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200){
                    if(divId!='')
                        document.getElementById(divId).innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
                    else{
                        // do something else
                    }
                }
            }
            xmlhttp.open("POST", "script_url", true); //file
            xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
            xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-length", params.length); //length
            xmlhttp.setRequestHeader("Connection", "close"); 
            xmlhttp.send(params); //parameters
        }

ajax_call_1 function arguments are:

divId : id of the html element that will hold the result after the AJAX call

params : parameters that should be sent with the request i.e. id, name or some sort of other values you need to send.

To be honest this 2 functions are not very reusable. I am in progress of changing them to be more abstract so they can be used for every 2 simultaneously made AJAX calls, but for now they do a good job.

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