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This is how I generate a URL in ASP.NET MVC currently:

Url.Action("Index", new { page = 2 })

In previous frameworks I have used, there were special url functions which created a url based on the current url, only modifying the parts you wanted to change. This is in Pylons:

{{ url.current(page=2) }}

This would come in handy with partial views, where the partial view may be showing a list of items but not necessarily know which controller they belong to.

Two questions - why is such an obviously useful feature missing from ASP.NET MVC, and is there some common alternative way of doing what I mentioned with partial views? Maybe I'm approaching partial views completely wrong?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

why is such an obviously useful feature missing from ASP.NET MVC

What makes you think that such feature is missing:

string url = Url.Action(null, new { page = 2 });

or:

string url = Url.RouteUrl(new { page = 2 });
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I didn't know you could pass null, but it still doesn't solve my problem, because you have specify all of the route arguments otherwise it doesn't include them. So if I have /search?s=billy, it simply drops the billy. This forces me to include the search string in my list partial view, when ideally the list shouldn't be concerned with what the url is. –  NoPyGod Jan 19 '12 at 0:09
    
The answer to this is here if anyone needs it stackoverflow.com/questions/8919851/… –  NoPyGod Jan 19 '12 at 1:45
    
@NoPyGod Please check the question you linked on the comment above, I've added an answer to it that you may find useful. stackoverflow.com/questions/8919851/… –  Iravanchi Jan 9 at 19:40

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