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Latest version of Sqlite (3.7.10) wanted to link __msize function and since Delphi memory manager can not report the size of a memory block, I had to introduce a hack (d5 compatible)

function __msize(p: pointer): Cardinal;cdecl;
begin
  Result:=PInteger(integer(p)-4)^-6;
end;

Are there other solutions inside Sqlite (defines?) or Delphi to fix this so no undocumented features are used.

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I think I'd be inclined to find the C code that wants to use msize and try to remove it if possible. I thought msize was an MSVC special in any case. –  David Heffernan Jan 18 '12 at 10:26
    
This hack won't work with the newer heap manager (FastMM4), I suspect. You should better rely on our answer below. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 18 '12 at 13:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Around line # 15195 in the source code, comment the following lines:

/*
** Windows systems have malloc_usable_size() but it is called _msize()
*/
#if !defined(HAVE_MALLOC_USABLE_SIZE) && SQLITE_OS_WIN
# define HAVE_MALLOC_USABLE_SIZE 1
# define malloc_usable_size _msize
#endif

into

/*
** Windows systems have malloc_usable_size() but it is called _msize()
#if !defined(HAVE_MALLOC_USABLE_SIZE) && SQLITE_OS_WIN
# define HAVE_MALLOC_USABLE_SIZE 1
# define malloc_usable_size _msize
#endif
*/

It will disable the memory reuse of SQLite3 malloc, and will rely on the better FastMM4 reallocmem() implementation.

See this commit e.g. for our Open Source implementation of SQLite3 static linking.

Additional information:

I think that we'd get rid of this issue in 3.7.11, as stated by this commit: a new SQLITE_WITHOUT_MSIZE global symbol will be added, and will be able to build the amalgamation source code without changing its content, just by setting the appropriate SQLITE_WITHOUT_MSIZE define. In the meanwhile, the easiest is to comment the above lines.

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+1 This is what I was thinking of in my comment. Of course it seems Maksee is on D5 with the old Borland MM. –  David Heffernan Jan 18 '12 at 13:12
    
Thanks, I did some research in parallel, but anyway you posted a good answer –  Maksee Jan 18 '12 at 14:42
    
@Maksee I recommend you switch from the delphi Borland memory manager into using FastMM4. It speeds up the application a lot, especially when it comes with database handling (a statically linked SQLite3 engine will be much faster), objects allocation, and string processing. And you'll find some nice features, like memory leak reporting. It works like a charm with Delphi 5. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 18 '12 at 19:00
    
@Arnaud, can you sample an SQL query that will be much faster with FastMM? I saw that sqlite usually is very modest in memory requesting so even with amazingly fast memory manager I doubt it can affect the performance that much. Although thanks for your advice, I will probably try this approach –  Maksee Jan 19 '12 at 7:24
    
When I insert 10000 rows of data within a transaction, FastMM4 makes the process much faster. It is at least what our regression tests show in our mORMot framework. And also retrieving of data is faster. Just try it, you'll be convinced. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 19 '12 at 21:24

You can use SizeOfMem from JCL JclSysUtils unit.

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Nice unit, thanks, da-soft ) –  Maksee Jan 19 '12 at 7:26

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