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What is the best way (concisest, clearest, idiomatic) to catch a MatchError, when assigning values with pattern matching?

Example:

val a :: b :: Nil = List(1,2,3) // throws scala.MatchError

The best way I found so far:

val a :: b :: Nil = try {
    val a1 :: b1 :: Nil = List(1,2,3)
    List(a1, b1)
  catch { case e:MatchError => // handle error here }

Is there an idiomatic way to do this?

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1  
You could also use scala.util.control.Exception. –  Alexey Romanov Jan 18 '12 at 10:48
1  
What is the expected behavior? –  missingfaktor Jan 18 '12 at 13:54
2  
Isn't a MatchError exactly the thing you want to throw if a pattern match assignment fails? Otherwise I would personally use other control constructs to handle the problem differently. –  Dan Burton Jan 18 '12 at 17:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Slightly improving on Kim's solution:

val a :: b :: Nil = List(1, 2, 3) match {
  case x @ _ :: _ :: Nil => x
  case _ => //handle error
}

If you could provide more information on how you might handle the error, we could provide you a better solution.

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About handling - probably just throwing an appropriate exception. –  Rogach Jan 18 '12 at 14:14

Why not simply

val a::b::Nil = List(1,2,3) match {
  case a1::b1::Nil => {
    a1::b1::Nil
  }
  case _ => //handle error
}

?

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1  
That's still 4 lines long and it would have ridiculous code reduplication in complex pattern matches. –  Rogach Jan 18 '12 at 11:31
    
In complex pattern matches, using multiple assignments with exceptions will be a real mess. Kim's answer is th emost idiomatic. –  Nicolas Jan 18 '12 at 12:00

The following doesn't catch the error but avoids (some of; see Nicolas' comment) it. I don't know whether this is interesting to the asker.

scala> val a :: b :: _ = List(1,2,3)
a: Int = 1
b: Int = 2
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1  
It doesn't avoid anything if you have less than 2 elements. –  Nicolas Jan 18 '12 at 14:21

The simple solution is this:

List(1, 2, 3) match {
   case a :: b :: Nil => .....
   case _ => // handle error
}

I don't like to match twice, because it is redundant. The "val" with pattern matching should only be used when you are sure it matches, or add a try /catch block.

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