Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We are developing an iphone app that sends json strings of locations user has been at to a web app (JAVA) that is deployed on google app engine. We use htpp requests to send these strings. Our problem is that the the strings are large sometimes and this takes too long time. Is there any other method?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can compress your JSON. This is the piece of code for GAE:

JSONObject json = new JSONObject(uncompress(Base64.decode(encodedJSONData)));

This is the uncompress method:

protected String uncompress(byte[] compressedData) throws IOException {
    StringBuffer data = new StringBuffer();
    GZIPInputStream stream = new GZIPInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(compressedData));
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(stream));
    String line;
    while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
        data.append(line);
    }
    return data.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
There's absolutely no point in base64 encoding the compressed data, except as a way to waste space. –  Nick Johnson Jan 19 '12 at 0:37
    
The Base64 encode is necessary to send through HTTP request. You suggest another way? –  Victor Jan 19 '12 at 12:09
    
No, it's not. You can send binary data in an HTTP request just fine. –  Nick Johnson Jan 19 '12 at 23:17

If your system is sending a collection of locations, try not sending them all at a time, but splitting the whole collection in small blocks, with a size that you estimate doesn't take too much time.

Another idea: if you do this sending as a background process, the main process (as in user interface) shouldn't be penalized.

share|improve this answer
1  
We had the problem of request timing out before, so we had to divide the string to chunks, so now we are actually sending the collection in chunks, but it is still taking a long time, although it always works. Sending in the background is a good option, because it will not interfere with UI and user experience. But what I wonder is that why much bigger files (for example photos) upload in apps like facebook or twitter so fast? Are they using another protocol? –  user1156139 Jan 18 '12 at 12:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.