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I have a IEnumerable where the model of the SaleReport is as follow:

    public int ID { get; set; }
    public DateTime StartDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime EndDate { get; set; }
    public decimal Amount { get; set; }
    public SalesReportProduct Product { get; set; }
    public int ItemID { get; set; }
    public int LanguageID { get; set; }
    public int ProductID { get; set; }

I am filling this IEnumerable with db entries based on dateTime values:

salesReports = _salesReport.GetAll(fromDate, toDate);

Then I have a list of int that are all the available ItemID:

var ItemIDList = new List<int>();

My problem is that I have to insert all the SalesReport with ItemID that is not in the IEnumerable, so for each of the value of the ItemIDList I check if there is at least one corresponding ItemID in the IEnumerable, if not I have to append a new SalesReport with that ItemID.

How can I do this easily?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the Range & Except functions to do this.

var unusedIds = Enumerable.Range(1, _salesReport.select(sr => sr.ItemID).Max())
                .Except(_salesReport.select(sr => sr.ItemID));
ItemIDList.AddRange(unusedIds);

I have no idea how expensive the Except function is, at a guess it does a Find in _salesReport for each item in the range. I'll look it up and get back to you.

. . . and of course I was wrong Jon Skeets Eudlinq implementation of Except only consumes each sequence once, ILSpy shows me similar optimizations in the .Net source.

NB: The call to Max() to get the range of ints will - of course - iterate through _salesReport once, so in total this iterates through _salesReport twice.

If this is too expensive you can cache the ids from _salesReport

var usedIds = _salesReport.select(sr => sr.ItemID).ToList();
var unusedIds = Enumerable.Range(1, usedIds.Max()).Except(usedIds);
ItemIDList.AddRange(unusedIds);

. . . and actually, you can save yourself one number. We check to see is Max() in the list, but of course we know Max is in the list because we got it from the list, ergo we don't need to include Max in the range of numbers we're going to check.

var usedIds = _salesReport.select(sr => sr.ItemID).ToList();
var unusedIds = Enumerable.Range(1, usedIds.Max() - 1).Except(usedIds);
ItemIDList.AddRange(unusedIds);
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As an exercise, I tried to solve this in the most efficient way possible:

        var reports = _salesReports.OrderBy(x=>x.ItemId).Select(x=>x.ItemId);
        var requiredReports = ItemIdList.OrderBy(x=>x);

        int reportsCount = reports.Count();
        int requiredCount = requiredReports.Count();

        List<int> missingReports = new List<int>();

        int reportIndex = 0;
        int requiredIndex = 0;
        while (reportIndex < reportsCount && requiredIndex < requiredCount)
        {
            if (reports[reportIndex] == requiredReports[requiredIndex])
            {
                reportIndex++;
                requiredIndex++;
                continue;
            }
            if (reports[reportIndex] < requiredReports[requiredIndex])
            {
                reportIndex++;
                continue;
            }
            if (reports[reportIndex] > requiredReports[requiredIndex])
            {
                missingReports.Add(requiredReports[requiredIndex]);
                requiredIndex++;
                continue;
            }
        }
        for (var i = requiredIndex; i < requiredCount; i++ )
        {
            missingReports.Add(requiredReports[i]);
        }

Obviously, for clarity of code, you should use Linq. This is to avoid having to iterate over the lists multiple times, but the cost of doing so would be worthwhile for ability to clearly understand the code.

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