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I have a dataset akin to this

User    Date        Value
A       2012-01-01  4
A       2012-01-02  5   
A       2012-01-03  6
A       2012-01-04  7
B       2012-01-01  2
B       2012-01-02  3   
B       2012-01-03  4
B       2012-01-04  5

I want to create a lag of Value, respecting User.

User    Date        Value   Value.lag
A       2012-01-01  4       NA
A       2012-01-02  5       4
A       2012-01-03  6       5
A       2012-01-04  7       6
B       2012-01-01  2       NA
B       2012-01-02  3       2   
B       2012-01-03  4       3
B       2012-01-04  5       4

I've done it very inefficiently in a loop

df$value.lag1<-NA
levs<-levels(as.factor(df$User))
levs
  for (i in 1:length(levs)) {
    temper<- subset(df,User==as.numeric(levs[i]))
    temper<- rbind(NA,temper[-nrow(temper),])  
df$value.lag1[df$User==as.numeric(as.character(levs[i]))]<- temper
      }

But this is very slow. I've looked at using by and tapply, but not figured out how to make them work.

I don't think XTS or TS will work because of the User element.

Any suggestions?

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I think the plm package has an implementation for this type of data. –  Seb Jan 18 '12 at 13:02
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use ddply: it cuts a data.frame into pieces and transforms each piece.

d <- data.frame( 
  User = rep( LETTERS[1:3], each=10 ),
  Date = seq.Date( Sys.Date(), length=30, by="day" ),
  Value = rep(1:10, 3)
)
library(plyr)
d <- ddply( 
  d, .(User), transform,
  # This assumes that the data is sorted
  Value = c( NA, Value[-length(Value)] ) 
)
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Works well. Thanks Vincent. –  Daniel Egan Jan 19 '12 at 2:46
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Similarly, you could use tapply

# Create Data
user = c(rep('A',4),rep('B',4))
date = rep(seq(as.Date('2012-01-01'),as.Date('2012-01-04'),1),2)
value = c(4:7,2:5) 
df = data.frame(user,date,value)
# Get lagged values
df$value.lag = unlist(tapply(df$value, df$user, function(x) c(NA,x[-length(df$value)])))

The idea is exactly the same: take value, split it by user, and then run a function on each subset. The unlist brings it back into vector format.

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Provided the table is ordered by User and Date, this can be done with zoo. The trick is not to specify an index at this point.

library(zoo)
df <-read.table(text="User Date Value
A 2012-01-01 4
A 2012-01-02 5
A 2012-01-03 6
A 2012-01-04 7
B 2012-01-01 2
B 2012-01-02 3
B 2012-01-03 4
B 2012-01-04 5", header=TRUE, as.is=TRUE,sep = " ")

out <-zoo(df)

Value.lag <-lag(out,-1)[out$User==lag(out$User)]
res <-merge.zoo(out,Value.lag)
res <-res[,-(4:5)]  # to remove extra columns

  User.out Date.out   Value.out Value.Value.lag
1 A        2012-01-01 4         <NA>           
2 A        2012-01-02 5         4              
3 A        2012-01-03 6         5              
4 A        2012-01-04 7         6              
5 B        2012-01-01 2         <NA>           
6 B        2012-01-02 3         2              
7 B        2012-01-03 4         3              
8 B        2012-01-04 5         4 
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