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What is the benefit of having two try-catch as seen below? Taken from the book Beginning Hibernate.

protected void rollback() {
        try {
            getSession().getTransaction().rollback();
        } catch (HibernateException e) {
            // TODO change to log
            System.out.println(e);
        }

        try {
            getSession().close();
        } catch (HibernateException e) {
            // TODO change to log
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }
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1  
presumably because you want to close the session irrespective of whether the operation succeeds or not. –  Nim Jan 18 '12 at 12:58
3  
Why don't you just use a finally block? –  Mob Jan 18 '12 at 13:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It guarantees that close() will be invoked, even if rollback() throws an exception.

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2  
It's better use the close() on finally block fot that purpose. –  Victor Jan 18 '12 at 13:03
1  
@Victor, Says who? –  mre Jan 18 '12 at 13:03
    
@mre in case the exception that will be thrown from rollbadk is not HibernateException, for example any RuntimeException –  Aviram Segal Jan 18 '12 at 13:07

The initial purpose was to close the session even if the rollback() method throws an exception but this solutions is not good enough.

If roolback throws a RuntimeException the close code will never be called

You should do the following:

protected void rollback() {
        try {
            getSession().getTransaction().rollback();
        } catch (HibernateException e) {
            // TODO change to log
            System.out.println(e);
        } finally {
            try {
                getSession().close();
            } catch (HibernateException e) {
                // TODO change to log
                System.out.println(e);
            }
        }
    }

This ensures that the close code will be called no matter what.

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@Chin Boon As a general practice, you should do the "close()" operation inside "finally" block, so that you ensure that it always gets executed. This code block can then itself have its own try - catch block. –  Napte Jan 18 '12 at 13:59

None, really. If you replace that code with

protected void rollback() {
        try {
            getSession().getTransaction().rollback();
            getSession().close();
        } catch (HibernateException e) {
            // TODO change to log
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }

you still get pretty much the same info. There are some minute differences:

in the first case, the line getSession().close(); will still be called even if getSession().getTransaction().rollback(); throws an exception, while in my example it will not. The proper way to handle this however is to use a finally block if you want that .close() line to be called no matter what.

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no need for a finally, you'd presumably want to catch any exceptions thrown during the close() operation too.. –  Nim Jan 18 '12 at 13:01
    
You'll still need to use a try-catch in the finally block though. This just ends up making the method more verbose. –  mre Jan 18 '12 at 13:02
    
Not really, if your last .close() operation thows an exception you don't really want to catch that as there's no real good way to recover from it. I agree however that it's just a matter of taste. –  Shivan Dragon Jan 18 '12 at 13:03
1  
@AndreiBodnarescu, My comment was made with the assumption that OP didn't want the method to throw an exception. –  mre Jan 18 '12 at 13:05
    
agreed, good point. –  Shivan Dragon Jan 18 '12 at 13:06

The reason is independence between these parts. Both parts may fail independently. (And handled independently as well). A fail of 'rollback' invocation won't prevent execution of 'close' statement, as opposite to a single try-catch block approach for this case.

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