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Game.prototype.run = function() {
    window.setInterval(function() {
        var thisLoop = new Date().getTime();

        this.update();
        this.render();

        lastLoop = thisLoop;
    }, 1000 / this.fps);
};

game.js:198Uncaught TypeError: Object [object DOMWindow] has no method 'update'

Why is this happening ? "this" should relate to the Game object.

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It's because setInterval-functions are executed in global scope(window). It's window.setInterval() not Game.setInterval() –  Dr.Molle Jan 18 '12 at 13:21
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Cache the this variable, or use Function.bind:

Game.prototype.run = function() {
    var _this = this;
    window.setInterval(function() {
        var thisLoop = new Date().getTime();
        _this.update();
        _this.render();
        lastLoop = thisLoop;
    }, 1000 / this.fps);
};

Or, using Function.bind:

Game.prototype.run = function() {
    window.setInterval((function() {
        ... 
    }.bind(this), 1000 / this.fps);
};

this in a function passed to setInterval refers to the global window object, or is undefined (in strict mode).

Another method, similar to the first one. Pass this as a parameter to the function (so that no extra local variable is used):

Game.prototype.run = function() {
    window.setInterval(function(_this) {
        var thisLoop = new Date().getTime();
        _this.update();
        _this.render();
        lastLoop = thisLoop;
    }, 1000 / this.fps, this);
};
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Hum I tried caching this before with another function but it didn't work. Don't know why it does now, but thanks! –  Elias Jan 18 '12 at 13:22
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Try this :

Game.prototype.run = function() {
    var intervalCallBack = function() {
        var thisLoop = new Date().getTime();
        this.update();
        this.render();
        lastLoop = thisLoop;
    };
    var self = this;
    window.setInterval(function(){intervalCallBack.call(self);}, 1000 / this.fps);
};

Because of the fact that setInterval and setTimeout executes your callback in the global context, your this "pointer" that you used to refer to your game object is now referring to the global object (window) , which of course has no method 'update'.

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It does work, but the interval does only fire once. –  Elias Jan 18 '12 at 13:26
    
@elias94xx : see update :) –  gion_13 Jan 18 '12 at 13:35
    
Yup does works now, interessting. I'll stick to the cache method though, but keep yours in mind in case something still won't work. :) –  Elias Jan 18 '12 at 14:03
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No, this in the scope of the function refers to the function itself. Its somewhat hard to wrap your head around scoping in JS if you're not used to it.

The easy solution is to cache the context of "this" outside the anonymous function and use that instead.

Game.prototype.run = function() {
  var game = this;
  window.setInterval(function() {
    var thisLoop = new Date().getTime();
    game.update();
    game.render();
    lastLoop = thisLoop;
  }, 1000 / this.fps);
};
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DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/kmendes/awzMn/

In this case there's no way you can do that because the setInterval function has a different scope. This is what you can do:

Game.prototype.run = function() {
    var currentGame = this;
    window.setInterval(function() {
        var thisLoop = new Date().getTime();

        currentGame.update();
        currentGame.render();

        lastLoop = thisLoop;
    }, 1000 / this.fps);
};
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