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Am encountering a strange issue transposing a large dataset. I want to get a list of non-linear flight routes (i.e. sub-lists of vectors with 30 vertices each) into a dataframe (with 32 columns for vertices). The list coerces into a data.frame no problem, but then fails when (1) transposing with t(x) and (2) converting to matrix.

To illustrate:

> class(gc)
[1] "list"

> length(gc)
[1] 58278

> gc[[1]][1:30]
 [1] 147.2200 147.1606 147.1012 147.0418 146.9824 146.9231 146.8638
 [8] 146.8046 146.7454 146.6862 146.6270 146.5679 146.5088 146.4498
[15] 146.3908 146.3318 146.2728 146.2139 146.1550 146.0961 146.0373
[22] 145.9785 145.9197 145.8610 145.8022 145.7435 145.6849 145.6262
[29] 145.5676 145.5090

> gc2 <- data.frame(gc)

> nrow(gc2)
[1] 32

> length(gc2)
[1] 116556

> gc2[1:5,1:5]
       lon       lat     lon.1    lat.1     lon.2
1 147.2200 -9.443383 -80.37861 43.46083 -87.90484
2 147.1606 -9.335072 -80.23135 43.52385 -87.53193
3 147.1012 -9.226751 -80.08379 43.58667 -87.15751
4 147.0418 -9.118420 -79.93591 43.64931 -86.78161
5 146.9824 -9.010080 -79.78773 43.71175 -86.40421

> gc3 <- t(gc2)

> nrow(gc3)
[1] 116556

> length(gc3)
[1] 3729792

> gc3 <- as.matrix(gc2)

> nrow(gc3)
[1] 32

> length(gc3)
[1] 3729792

The 3729792 figure is 116556*32..

Grateful for any assistance!

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What do you mean by "it fails"? The result of the transpose is a matrix, not a data.frame: its length is the number of elements, i.e., rows*columns -- the length of a data.frame is the number of columns. –  Vincent Zoonekynd Jan 18 '12 at 13:30
    
How about a working example that we can toy around with? –  Roman Luštrik Jan 18 '12 at 14:05
    
Welcome to SO. For future reference, questions are often clearer if they contain a question, rather than a statement about "this doesn't work". –  Richie Cotton Jan 18 '12 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

3729792 figure is 116556*32

That is correct. length() for a matrix tells you the number of elements the matrix holds (which you have verified). length() for a data.frame tells you the number of columns it has.

If you want to compare apples to apples in your data.frame vs. matrix comparison, use nrow() and ncol()

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks v.m. for the responses. And my apologies for the duplicate question and lack of clarity - I'm brand new to stackoverflow and still quite a newbie to R, so your patience is greatly appreciated. The problem was that I interpretted the t() output as having 3729792 columns since I didn't appreciate the ouput was a matrix. Thanks to you all for pointing that out! –  geotheory Jan 23 '12 at 18:18

I'm guessing a little at your data structure, but you've hinted that it's a list of numeric vectors.

n_routes <- 5
gc <- replicate(n_routes, runif(30), simplify = FALSE)
names(gc) <- letters[seq_len(n_routes)]

You can convert this list to be a vector with as.data.frame(gc) but note that data frames aren't meant to be transposed (it doesn't make sense if columns have different types.

This means that you need to convert to data frame and then to matrix before transposing.

gc2 <- t(as.matrix(as.data.frame(gc)))

Since all your columns are numeric, you may want to leave it as a matrix. Alternatively, use as.data.frame again to make it a data frame.

as.data.frame(gc2)

As others have pointed out, length has different meanings for matrices and data frames. The definition for data frames – the number of columns – is unintuitive, and a legacy of S compatibility. Use ncol instead, since it gives the same answer, but with more readable code.

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