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As you know there are some ways to solve Tower of Hanoi, but they require all disks to be in one tower at the begining.

Now I wanna know is there any way to solve it, where the disks are already spread out randomly among the towers at the start.

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1  
The task for the tower of Hanoi is to transfer all disks from the first tower to the third. What is the task (i.e. the desired end state) in your case? What constraints hold on the initial state? –  Martin B Jan 18 '12 at 13:39
    
@MoeinHm, I've edited the question. I hope the current version makes sense. Is it clear for you? –  Aaron McDaid Jan 18 '12 at 13:43
    
@AaronMcDaid ,yes,tnx and I also sorry for my english,I should spend more time to improve it instead of computer:D –  MoeinHm Jan 18 '12 at 13:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, it is still solvable (assuming that there are no large disks on top of smaller disks). For example:

        1
  4     2
  6     5     3
  -------------

Find the largest contiguous stack containing 1. Here, it is {1,2}. Move that stack onto the next largest disk, ignoring any others. You can use the standard Tower of Hanoi algorithm for this step.

              1
  4           2
  6     5     3
  -------------

Repeat steps above. Next contiguous stack containing 1 is now {1,2,3}. Move it onto 4

  1
  2
  3           
  4           
  6     5  
  -------------

Same thing -- move {1,2,3,4} onto 5.

        1
        2
        3     
        4     
  6     5    
  -------------

Move {1,2,3,4,5} onto 6 now, and you're done. If you need to move the whole stack to a specific peg, use the standard solution once more.

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Is it possible to know the minimal number of movements to do ? Because your algorithm isn't the fastest way to solve it. –  Stephane Mathis Dec 24 '13 at 10:11
    
@StephaneMathis -- It isn't optimal? I can't think of a faster way, but I am certainly no expert, just someone who played with a wooden version of the puzzle long ago. What improvements would you suggest? Feel free to add an answer of your own :) –  Justin Dec 27 '13 at 1:21
1  
Well, in your example at the second step, it's better to move the 4 above the 5 and then 1-2-3 above the 4. You kind of skip the third step. –  Stephane Mathis Dec 27 '13 at 12:14

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