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I'm creating a table "InterviewTemp" , inserting data there, updating a second table with that data and then dropping the "InterviewTemp" table.

there is an example:

CREATE TABLE [entrevistasTemp](
    [id_usuario] [int] NULL,
    [id_entrevista] [int] NULL,
    [comentarios] [varchar](300) NULL
)

INSERT [entrevistasTemp] ([id_usuario], [id_entrevista], [comentarios]) VALUES (12099, 4515, CONVERT(TEXT, N'Riesgo muy alto.  Marun Victoria, '))
INSERT [entrevistasTemp] ([id_usuario], [id_entrevista], [comentarios]) VALUES (15347, 4516, CONVERT(TEXT, N'Riesgo muy alto.  Marun Victoria, '))

UPDATE entrevistas 
    set entrevistas.comentarios = entrevistasTemp.comentarios 
    from entrevistasTemp
WHERE entrevistas.id = entrevistasTemp.id_entrevista

drop table entrevistasTemp

there is a better way to do this?

EDIT: just inserting 4.5k rows

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Create a temporary table instead of a table:

CREATE TABLE #entrevistasTemp(
    [id_usuario] [int] NULL,
    [id_entrevista] [int] NULL,
    [comentarios] [varchar](300) NULL
)

INSERT #entrevistasTemp ([id_usuario], [id_entrevista], [comentarios]) VALUES (12099, 4515, CONVERT(TEXT, N'Riesgo muy alto.  Marun Victoria, '))
INSERT #entrevistasTemp ([id_usuario], [id_entrevista], [comentarios]) VALUES (15347, 4516, CONVERT(TEXT, N'Riesgo muy alto.  Marun Victoria, '))

UPDATE entrevistas 
    set entrevistas.comentarios = #entrevistasTemp.comentarios 
    from #entrevistasTemp
WHERE entrevistas.id = #entrevistasTemp.id_entrevista

drop table #entrevistasTemp
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1  
+1 I'd like to add that if your connection ends when this code finishes, you can omit the drop table statement; MSSQL will take care of it for you, which is the real value of temporary tables. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jan 18 '12 at 14:23
    
+1, also #temp tables are the kind of like an application being "thread" safe, IE each connection gets its own "local" scope #temp table. so if it is possible for multiple users to run the same processing simultaneously, and you want to prevent them from stepping on each other (create fails because table already exists, seeing/changing the other users data, etc) temp tables are the way to go. –  KM. Jan 18 '12 at 15:23

Answer solely depending upon size of data being inserted and frequency of rows being accessed.

If you have a large dataset then you can create a table insert data into that table then implement indexing in the table then use that table for any further operations and thereafter drop the table.

If data size is limited. Then going with answer by aF would be preferable.

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Even better than the temporary table (if your version of SQL Server supports it [2005+]) is a table variable. When you create a temporary table, SQL Server must recompile the query any time it runs. Table variables don't have this issue. They are also created in memory rather than on disk, and have fewer locking and transaction log contention issues.

Code would look like this:

DECLARE @entrevistasTemp TABLE
(
    [id_usuario] [int] NULL,
    [id_entrevista] [int] NULL,
    [comentarios] [varchar](300) NULL
)

INSERT INTO @entrevistasTemp ([id_usuario], [id_entrevista], [comentarios]) VALUES (12099,
    4515, CONVERT(TEXT, N'Riesgo muy alto.  Marun Victoria, '))
INSERT INTO @entrevistasTemp ([id_usuario], [id_entrevista], [comentarios]) VALUES (15347,
    4516, CONVERT(TEXT, N'Riesgo muy alto.  Marun Victoria, '))

UPDATE entrevistas 
    SET entrevistas.comentarios = et.comentarios 
    FROM @entrevistasTemp et
WHERE entrevistas.id = et.id_entrevista
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