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How expensive are exceptions in C#? It seems like they are not incredibly expensive as long as the stack is not deep; however I have read conflicting reports.

Is there definitive report that hasn't been rebutted?

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Exceptions that are not handled are not expensive. So you can use try/block. –  Kishore Jangid Dec 2 '12 at 1:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Jon Skeet wrote Exceptions and Performance in .NET in Jan 2006

Which was updated Exceptions and Performance Redux (thanks @Gulzar)

To which Rico Mariani chimed in The True Cost of .NET Exceptions -- Solution


Also reference: Krzysztof Cwalina - Design Guidelines Update: Exception Throwing

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1  
updated one: yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/exceptions2.html –  Gulzar Nazim May 21 '09 at 3:10
    
Great - thanks. –  Chance May 21 '09 at 3:43

I guess I'm in the camp that if performance of exceptions impacts your application then you're throwing WAY too many of them. Exceptions should be for exceptional conditions, not as routine error handling.

That said, my recollection of how exceptions are handled is essentially walking up the stack finding a catch statement that matches the type of the exception thrown. So performance will be impacted most by how deep you are from the catch and how many catch statements you have.

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@Colin while I agree with your statement, you're meandering off-topic and your tone is a little preachy. –  Robert Paulson May 21 '09 at 3:10
    
And then you have Java camp, where exceptions are encouraged. –  Unknown May 21 '09 at 3:20
5  
If stating my opinion is "preaching", then so be it. My point still stands that if exceptions are impacting your performance then you need to throw fewer exceptions. It's not exactly what Chance's question is about but it most certainly is on topic. How am I supposed to know of Chance had considered my point already or not? –  Colin Burnett May 21 '09 at 3:23
3  
Doesn't sound preachy to me. Actually sounds just like what Jon Skeet said, "If you ever get to the point where exceptions are significantly hurting your performance, you have problems in terms of your use of exceptions beyond just the performance." –  RedFilter May 21 '09 at 3:24
    
Exceptions can become a performance issue even where they are an exceptional circumstance. For example, a third party API you rely on becoming unavailable during your peak load. Exceptions are appropriate (unavoidable even?)but even with an appropriate response, performance could be a concern to allow you to respond correctly (e.g. custom error page), rather than being DOSed (did not respond etc.). –  penguat Feb 4 at 15:31

Having read that exceptions are costly in terms of performance I threw together a simple measurement program, very similar to the one Jon Skeet published years ago. I mention this here mainly to provide updated numbers.

It took the program below 29914 milliseconds to process one million exceptions, which amounts to 33 exceptions per millisecond. That is fast enough to make exceptions a viable alternative to return codes for most situations.

Please note, though, that with return codes instead of exceptions the same program runs less than one millisecond, which means exceptions are at least 30,000 times slower than return codes. As stressed by Rico Mariani these numbers are also minimum numbers. In practice, throwing and catching an exception will take more time.

Measured on a laptop with Intel Core2 Duo T8100 @ 2,1 GHz with .NET 4.0 in release build not run under debugger (which would make it way slower).

This is my test code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int iterations = 1000000;
    Console.WriteLine("Starting " + iterations.ToString() + " iterations...\n");

    var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

    // Test exceptions
    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();
    for (int i = 1; i <= iterations; i++)
    {
        try
        {
            TestExceptions();
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            // Do nothing
        }
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Exceptions: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

    // Test return codes
    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();
    int retcode;
    for (int i = 1; i <= iterations; i++)
    {
        retcode = TestReturnCodes();
        if (retcode == 1)
        {
            // Do nothing
        }
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Return codes: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

    Console.WriteLine("\nFinished.");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

static void TestExceptions()
{
    throw new Exception("Failed");
}

static int TestReturnCodes()
{
    return 1;
}
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So they're not viable in a tight game loop, as I discovered. I was trying to be lazy with my index-out-of-bounds checks :) –  Mark Dec 2 '12 at 2:15

In my case, exceptions were very expensive. I rewrote this:

public BlockTemplate this[int x,int y, int z]
{
    get
    {
        try
        {
            return Data.BlockTemplate[World[Center.X + x, Center.Y + y, Center.Z + z]];
        }
        catch(IndexOutOfRangeException e)
        {
            return Data.BlockTemplate[BlockType.Air];
        }
    }
}

Into this:

public BlockTemplate this[int x,int y, int z]
{
    get
    {
        int ix = Center.X + x;
        int iy = Center.Y + y;
        int iz = Center.Z + z;
        if (ix < 0 || ix >= World.GetLength(0)
            || iy < 0 || iy >= World.GetLength(1)
            || iz < 0 || iz >= World.GetLength(2)) 
            return Data.BlockTemplate[BlockType.Air];
        return Data.BlockTemplate[World[ix, iy, iz]];
    }
}

And noticed a good speed increase of about 30 seconds. This function gets called at least 32K times at startup. Code isn't as clear as to what the intention is, but the cost savings were huge.

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1  
Exceptions that are not handled are not expensive. –  Kishore Jangid Dec 2 '12 at 1:08
    
So the overall cost was roughly 1 ms (30 s / 32,000 iterations)? Any idea how many of the 32,000 tests were failing? –  Jon of All Trades Feb 6 at 16:34
    
@JonofAllTrades No, sorry. This was years ago :-) –  Mark Feb 6 at 16:39

Barebones exception objects in C# are fairly lightweight; it's usually the ability to encapsulate an InnerException that makes it heavy when the object tree becomes too deep.

As for a definitive, report, I'm not aware of any, although a cursory dotTrace profile (or any other profiler) for memory consumption and speed will be fairly easy to do.

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The performance hit with exceptions seems to be at the point of generating the exception object (albeit too small to cause any concerns 90% of the time). The recommendation therefore is to profile your code - if exceptions are causing a performance hit, you write a new high-perf method that does not use exceptions. (An example that comes to mind would be (TryParse introduced to overcome perf issues with Parse which uses exceptions)

THat said, exceptions in most cases do not cause significant performance hits in most situations - so the MS Design Guideline is to report failures by throwing exceptions

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However, it does say exceptions should not normally be thrown: "Do not use exceptions for normal flow of control. Except for system failures, there should generally be a way to write code that avoids exceptions being thrown. For example, you can provide a way to check preconditions before calling a member to allow users to write code that does not throw exceptions." –  Andrew Aylett Feb 2 '10 at 11:40
    
@Andrew: Right. Maybe my response to another question will help clarify my stand stackoverflow.com/questions/859494 . Throw exceptions only when the method is unable to carry out its reason for being. –  Gishu Feb 2 '10 at 12:28
    
Agreed :). I just wasn't sure that "report failures" was clear enough. I like those guidelines. –  Andrew Aylett Feb 2 '10 at 12:55

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