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How do I instantiate a class in CoffeeScript when I only have the name of the class in a string?

class Dog
  bark:->
    "Woof"

className = "Dog"
dog = new className  # <--- I would like to create an instance here using the string
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

With a bit of foresight you can do this pretty easily and protect yourself against using eval. Keep a list somewhere of the classes that you want to instantiate by name:

class Dog
  bark:->
    "Woof"

# Or window.named_classes if you need to access
# `named_classes` globally (or just in another
# CoffeeScript file).
named_classes = { Dog: Dog }

and then use your lookup table instead of eval:

name = 'Dog'
dog  = new named_classes[name]

When you say class Dog, you end up with a local variable called Dog:

var Dog;
Dog = (function() { /* ... */ })();

and there's no way to get at a local JavaScript variable unless you store it somewhere that you can access by name. Also note that eval won't work if you define Dog in one CoffeeScript file and want to access it another, CoffeeScript wraps each file in self-executing anonymous function to limit variable scope:

all CoffeeScript output is wrapped in an anonymous function: (function(){ ... })(); This safety wrapper, combined with the automatic generation of the var keyword, make it exceedingly difficult to pollute the global namespace by accident.

If you'd like to create top-level variables for other scripts to use, attach them as properties on window, or on the exports object in CommonJS.

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1  
To add to that, rather than collecting them after the fact, you might find it more convenient to namespace them to start with. Somewhere before everything else: myClasses = {} Later on: class myClasses.Dog Finally: dog = new myClasses["Dog"] –  Chris Subagio Jan 18 '12 at 19:22
    
@Chris: Yes, that's a good point. You could use class window.Dog or class window.named_classes.Dog but window.Dog risks polluting window and window.named_classes.Dog makes local access to Dog a bit cumbersome. You could also do named_classes.Dog = class Dog ... but that is, IMO, a bit ugly. –  mu is too short Jan 18 '12 at 19:29
    
@Chris: Looks like we're editing comments at the same time (and my internet connection is dodgy!). Anyway, there are various ways to get the desired effect, the important thing is to store a reference to the class in an object somewhere so that it has a program-accessible name. –  mu is too short Jan 18 '12 at 19:41
1  
aye, all manner of options here. The actual container can be aliased locally too, so you could have exp = window.named_classes at the top, followed by class exports.Dog which leads to the alright new exports.Dog locally, which still being able to new window.named_classes["Dog"] from anywhere. Having said that, if you're already declaring window.named_classes = {} anyway, then you can forever after just refer to it as plain named_classes elsewhere. –  Chris Subagio Jan 18 '12 at 20:29
    
What happens if you don't have a list of the classes beforehand? I.E. If you are writing some kind of framework plugin system, where others are going to write plugins and give them names, after the fact? I guess that if you always got the plugin writers to add their classes to your named_classes object then that would be OK. –  Pete BD Jan 20 '12 at 11:24
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If using CommonJS modules then can one do something like this?

file: Dog.coffee

class Dog
  sound: ()->
    "woof"

file: Cat.coffee

class Cat
  sound: ()->
    "meow"

file: Main.coffee

className = 'Dog'
Animal = require(className)
animal = new Animal
animal.sound
# => "woof"

className = 'Cat'
Animal = require(className)
animal = new Animal
animal.sound
# => "meow"
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Bare in mind this isn't very good code, but I couldn't think of a better way.

Using eval:

class Dog
  bark:->
    "Woof"


className = "Dog"
dog = new (eval(classname))()

I'll keep thinking.

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Yeah, I thought about this but I was hoping there would be a more attractive method. –  Pete BD Jan 18 '12 at 18:31
    
Down vote for a very unnecessary call to eval. Avoid eval! mu has the right answer here. –  Chris Subagio Jan 18 '12 at 20:24
    
@ChrisSubagio I did say that it wasn't a good idea, I just couldn't think of a better one. –  Jivings Jan 18 '12 at 21:14
    
up vote because he said it was bad code even before you down voted. balance restored. –  Adam Waite Jan 9 at 20:35
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How about this?

dog.coffee

class Dog
  bark:->
    "Woof"

app.coffee

@Dog = require './dog'
className = "Dog"
dog = new @[className]
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This is equivalent to: class @Dog bark: -> "woof" className = 'Dog' dog = new this[className] alert dog.bark() –  Pete BD Mar 15 '13 at 19:58
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