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Let's say I have an executable file called "execfile". I want to read that file using a C++ program (on Unix) and then execute it from memory. I know this is possible on Windows but I was not able to find a solution for Unix.

In pseudo-code it would be something like this:

declare buffer (char *)
readfile "execfile" in buffer
execute buffer

Just to make it clear: obviously I could just execute the file using system("execfile"), but, as I said, this is not what I intend to do.

Thank you.

EDIT 1: To make it even more clear (and the reason why I can't use dlopen): the reason I need this functionality is because the executable files are going to be generated dynamically and so I cannot just build all of them at once in a single library. To be more precise I'm building a tool that will first encrypt an executable file with a key and then it will be able to execute that encrypted file, first decrypting it and then executing it (and I don't want to have a copy of the decrypted file on the file system).

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Loading the executable in memory is the role of the OS. And even if you did it by hand, you wouldn't take into account 1. dynamic libraries, and 2. COW. –  fge Jan 18 '12 at 15:59
    
On Windows you have to use VirtualAlloc and manually create some pages with PAGE_EXECUTE access (since data pages aren't executable by default). I presume you also have to do something like this on UNIX style OSes since non-executable heaps are the norm these days. –  Benj Jan 18 '12 at 16:02
    
Out of curiosity, are you trying to run dynamically generated native code? That's the only reason I can imagine wanting to do this.. –  Benj Jan 18 '12 at 16:04
    
I just added an EDIT to my original question so you can see why I need this. I hope it's clear. –  Razvan Jan 18 '12 at 16:08
    
what about putting the file on /dev/shm (or any other ramdisk like area) and after execing it, unlink it? –  PlasmaHH Jan 18 '12 at 16:11

2 Answers 2

You cannot without writing a mountain of code. Loading and linking an a.out is a kernel facility, not a user mode facility, on linux.

You'd be better off making a shared library and loading it with dlopen.

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Thanks for your reply. The reason I need this is because the executable files are going to be generated dynamically and so I cannot just build all of them at once in a single library. To be more precise I'm building a tool that will first encrypt an executable file with a key and then it will be able to execute that encrypted file (and I don't want to have a copy of the decrypted file on the file system). –  Razvan Jan 18 '12 at 16:04
    
Don't build executables. Build .so files. You can then decrypt and load them. –  bmargulies Jan 18 '12 at 16:38
    
Unfortunately I cannot do that either. The scripts come as shell scripts and are provided by a 3rd party entity. –  Razvan Jan 18 '12 at 18:37
    
Shell scripts? So are you having executables or shell scripts? Running shell scripts in-memory sohuld be possible, provided that they don't call any other protected code. –  j_kubik Jan 18 '12 at 21:44

The solution to load-and-run -- not necessarily in C++ -- is to use dlopen+dlsym to load dynamic library and obtain a pointer to function defined in the library.

See C++ dlopen mini HOWTO for description of solving problems with C++ symbols in dynamic libraries.

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