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I'm making a shift cipher that reads in text from a file and decodes it. The decryption works fine howver i can't figure out how to find the length of the file without hardcoding it into the size of the char array. It also only reads in one line, anything with a newline in corrupts.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, i've left out the main block of code as that deals with the array after it has been read in and seemed a bit long and irrelevant.

string fileName;
cout << "Please enter the locations of your encrypted text (e.g ""encryptedText.txt""): ";
getline( cin, fileName );
char encryptedMessage[446]; //How do i read in the file length and declare the array size as a variable instead of [446]?
char decryptedMessage[446];

ifstream in(fileName);
if(in.get(encryptedMessage, 446))
{
  [my decrypting code]
}
else
{
cout << "Couldn't successfully read file.\n";
}
system("pause");
share|improve this question
    
See the fourth test case in this previous answer. Change its s4 from a string to a vector, and it should be pretty much ready to go. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 18 '12 at 17:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use seekg to get the size of an entire file:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main () {
  long begin_byte, end_byte;
  ifstream in("example.txt");
  begin_byte = in.tellg();
  in.seekg (0, ios::end);
  end_byte = in.tellg();
  int total_bytes = end_byte - begin_byte;
  in.seekg(0, ios::begin);
  char *message = new char[total_bytes + 1];
  int index = 0;
  while (in) {
    message[index++] = in.get();
  }
  in.close();
  cout << "message is: " << message << endl;
  delete [] message;
  return 0;
}

You can read more about seekg, tellg and files in c++ as a whole here.

However a better solution then using char * is using a std:string and calling push_back on it while in has not ended:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main () {
  ifstream in("example.txt");
  string message;
  while (in) {
    message.push_back(in.get());
  }
  in.close();
  cout << "message is: " << message << endl;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Man, reading file character by character is just a terrible idea. You can read it in one go. –  user405725 Jan 18 '12 at 16:31
    
Agreed. But again you need to use something like the get function as decrypted_text sounds like something that will have special chars. There are better functions to read a chunk of the file with a given size. I could not find such a function that takes a string, though. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 18 '12 at 16:36
    
Right. That's why old school is using "open/stat/malloc/read" and new school falling for ifstream and vector :) Just beware that every time you show some code - newbies copy/paste it, and then we have a new generation of programmers... –  user405725 Jan 18 '12 at 16:41
    
Still... your comment got me thinking. Is there a way to read the whole file using ifstream and string without using an helper char* buffer? I thought about the read method, but there is no way to pass a pointer to the string data as its argument... –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 18 '12 at 16:55
1  
@istrandjev: Well, there is not. You can do sorta one-liner, but not as efficient as just reading the damn file into memory... See stackoverflow.com/questions/2602013/… –  user405725 Jan 18 '12 at 17:01

Well, a simple one-liner for reading a whole file into a dynamically sized array (don't use a statically sized array) of chars would be:

#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

std::vector<char> encryptedMessage(std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in),
                                   std::istreambuf_iterator<char>());

Don't mess with dynamic allocation yourself, just let std::vector do its job. And due to its optimized growth behaviour you don't really need to bother with checking the file size. Optimize for speed when neccessary or at least not before your files get larger than a few hundred characters. And of course the istreambuf_iterator (instead of istream_iterator) doesn't handle whitespace any special, it just takes each character raw from the file one by one.

You may do the same with a std::string instead of a std::vector<char>, but I'm not sure about its growth behaviour (maybe it always reallocates the array with one more element). But then again, who cares for speed when the file contains 400 charcters?

share|improve this answer

You cannot have Variable Length Arrays(VLA) in C++.
Compilers do provide VLA's as extensions but using them would make your code non-portable.

Simplest and Best Solution is to use std::string instead of character arrays.

You might get answers all over which advice you to use to use dynamically allocated arrays but using std::string is the best choice, so ignore those.

EDIT:
Since somebody downvoted this. I would be very interested in knowing the reasons(provided they are technical) to do so.

share|improve this answer
2  
@VladLazarenko: Really? Please enlighten us with the reference which states VLA's are allowed by the C++ Standard. –  Alok Save Jan 18 '12 at 16:16
2  
@Marobri: As simple as that –  Alok Save Jan 18 '12 at 16:18
1  
@VladLazarenko: Repeat: Please enlighten us with the reference which states VLA's are allowed by the C++ Standard. –  Alok Save Jan 18 '12 at 16:23
1  
@VladLazarenko: :) Thanks for giving me a hearty laugh at the end of an hectic day. –  Alok Save Jan 18 '12 at 16:34
1  
alloca_ is more portable than VLAs, use that instead. –  TBohne Jan 18 '12 at 16:52

You need dynamically allocated memory, and the best way to manage that is with std::vector.

std::vector<char> encryptedMessage;

encryptedMessage.resize(size_of_file);
in.get(&encryptedMessage[0], encryptedMessage.size());
share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to go on a limb and guess the OP doesnt know how to get the size of the file, and probably knew about vector. –  TBohne Jan 18 '12 at 16:49

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