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I've been working on some solutions for some questions that have been recently posted where the original questioners have been trying to query if a method exists in a given class. I've been trying to develop a solution using a SFINAE approach, but unfortunately I keep coming up empty.

Here was my attempt at a solution that isn't working for a class that allows us to detect if another class has a method called function():

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct sample_class
{
    void function() {}
};


template<typename T>
class test_size_call
{
    private:
        typedef char yes;
        typedef char (&no)[2];
        int tester[1];

        template <unsigned int>
        struct helper { static const unsigned int value = 1; };

        template<typename R>
        static yes test(int (&a)[helper<sizeof(std::declval<R>().function(), 0)>::value]);

        /* template<typename R>
        static no test(...); */

    public:
        static const bool value = (sizeof(test<T>(tester)) == sizeof(yes));
};


int main()
{
    cout << "Has function() method: " << test_size_call<sample_class>::value << endl;
        return 0;
}

The results, if you uncomment the catch-all test function, keep coming up as false. With the function commented out, I get a compiler error that there is not version of test that will take a int (&)[1] argument. I'm curious why the declval<R>().function() doesn't seem to be instantiating properly. For instance, if I changed it to something very explicit, like declval<T>().function() then it works. Unfortunately that's not SFINAE, because if the class doesn't have a function() method, rather than failing silently, I get a compiler error.

I'm sure there is something really simple I'm missing here. Thanks for any help you can provide.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Must be a problem with your compiler, Clang correctly prints 1 and 0 for the following code:

#include <utility>

template<typename T>
class test_size_call
{
    private:
        typedef char yes;
        typedef char (&no)[2];
        int tester[1];

        template <unsigned int>
        struct helper { static const unsigned int value = 1; };

        template<typename R>
        static yes test(int (&a)[helper<sizeof(std::declval<R>().function(), 0)>::value]);

        template<typename R>
        static no test(...);

    public:
        static const bool value = (sizeof(test<T>(tester)) == sizeof(yes));
};

#include <iostream>

struct sample_class
{
    void function() {}
};

struct sample_class2{};

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Has function() method: " << test_size_call<sample_class>::value << '\n';
    std::cout << "Has function() method 2: " << test_size_call<sample_class2>::value << '\n';
    return 0;
}

While GCC 4.5.1 does not. Note that it's fixed in GCC 4.7, as pointed out here.

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Okay, cool ... this was driving me a bit crazy as I could have swore it should have worked, but as you've pointed out, ideone with gcc 4.5.1 isn't giving the expected results. Since when was clang ahead of gcc in C++11 compliance? –  Jason Jan 18 '12 at 16:25
    
@Jason: Since they started working on C++11 support? :P I seriously don't know, but Clang is the most conforming compiler right now IIRC. Except the missing features of course, like lambdas, constexpr and initializer lists.. –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 16:27
    
@Jason: it's not that Clang is ahead as much as it is that Clang aims at being right rather than "complete". –  Matthieu M. Jan 18 '12 at 16:32
    
@Xeo: Regarding constexpr and initializer lists, does this still apply ? There's been a lot of worked poured into those two of late so I would expect them to be close to completion but has not been testing. –  Matthieu M. Jan 18 '12 at 16:35
    
@Matthieu: Atleast my snapshot from ~2 weeks ago doesn't support them in any semantic way, only syntactically. For example for(auto e : {1, 2, 3}) reports "cannot use type 'void' as a range". –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 16:48

Jason, if you are using Visual C++ then SFINAE does not work very well there (in particular it does not seem to work for data members of user-defined types, but it might still work for functions though).

For other compilers you can use something along these lines:

template <typename T>
struct has_function
{
  template <typename U, void (U::*f) ()> struct match_;
  template<typename > static char (&select_(...))[2];
  template<typename U> static char (&select_(match_<U, &U::function>* ))[1];

  enum { value = sizeof(select_<T>(0)) == 1 };
};

struct get
{
  void function();
};

int main()
{
  int t[(int)has_function<get>::value];
  (void)t;
}

There is a workaround for Visual C++ bug, check Workarounds tab here: http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/718729/c-type-equality-not-recognized-under-sfinae-context

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