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How do I get a PL/SQL program to end halfway through? I haven't been able to find any way to gracefully end the program if an exception occurs - if I handle it, it loops back into the code.

Basically what I want to do is force the app not to run in certain conditions. So, I want to add something like this to the top of the program:

BEGIN
    IF [condition]
        EXIT
    END IF
    [the rest of the program]
END

The suggested way is to throw an exception, but the block may well be an inner block - so the program outside of the block just keeps going.

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Are you asking how to get out of PL/SQL BEGIN-END block in the middle? –  Vitaly Polonetsky May 21 '09 at 5:18
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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can use RETURN

MWATSON@> set serveroutput on
MWATSON@> !cat test.sql

BEGIN
 IF 1 = 1 THEN
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('ABOUT TO EXIT');
    RETURN;
  END IF;
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('DID NOT EXIT');
END;

MWATSON@> @test
  8  /
ABOUT TO EXIT

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

MWATSON@>
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If you raise an exception that the block does not handle, the exception is always raised to the caller. So the easiest way to stop processing is raise an exception that is not handled anywhere in the call stack.

e.g.

DECLARE
    e_halt_processing EXCEPTION;
BEGIN
    IF [condition] THEN
        RAISE e_halt_processing;
    END IF;
    [the rest of the program]
END;
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In other words, it doesn't matter if this is in an inner block - as long as the outer block does not handle the exception, it will not "loop back" into the inner block but will be propogated to its caller. –  Jeffrey Kemp May 21 '09 at 5:57
1  
exceptions shouldn't be used to jump over code. you're reinventing goto. –  antony.trupe Jun 3 '09 at 2:57
1  
I disagree. PL/SQL doesn't support the "goto" statement; and raising an exception is quite different thing to "jumping over code". If the current block hits a condition that it is not designed to cope with, raising an exception is the way you can advise the calling process of that condition. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jun 3 '09 at 6:44
    
Just popping back to say that PL/SQL does have GOTO now. Of course, this doesn't change my answer one iota :) –  Jeffrey Kemp Apr 19 '13 at 0:28
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I know it's too late to respond, but I have one more way that is not mentioned in the previous answers.

Use RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR and catch this exception in EXCEPTION section. As this rolls back uncommitted transactions, make sure to commit them explicitly if required.

This way you can gracefully return from the program, instead of doing exception handling in IF block when you use RETURN.

I used this for reference. http://www.plsql-tutorial.com/plsql-exception-handling.htm

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I don't know PL/SQL but why don't you try (using your words):

BEGIN
    IF [!condition]
        [the rest of the program]
    END IF
END

Just thinking

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As long as you use sequential (not nested) pl/sql blocks and separate exception handling then RAISE works perfectly well. If you are RAISE ing exeptions in nested blocks then beware of a race condition.

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