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So I inherited a bit of code that's waiting for communication from a network source.

While it's waiting for more data from the network socket, Thread.sleep(10) is called. This appears to be causing a thread leak, as reported by jconsole and my thread dump here (there are hundreds of entries for Thread-68, Thread-385, etc... but I shortened for brevity):

Wed Jan 18 09:14:40 PST 2012
2012-01-18 09:14:50
Full thread dump Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (20.0-b11 mixed mode):

"Thread-69" daemon prio=10 tid=0x00007f01a047c800 nid=0x3725 waiting on condition [0x00007f019eaf4000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: TIMED_WAITING (sleeping)
        at java.lang.Thread.sleep(Native Method)
        at com.unitt.framework.websocket.simple.NetworkSocket.run(NetworkSocket.java:304)
        at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

"Thread-68" daemon prio=10 tid=0x00007f01a0500000 nid=0x371c waiting on condition [0x00007f019ecf6000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: TIMED_WAITING (sleeping)
        at java.lang.Thread.sleep(Native Method)
        at com.unitt.framework.websocket.simple.NetworkSocket.run(NetworkSocket.java:304)
        at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

The code in question:

public class NetworkSocket implements NetworkSocketFacade, Runnable
{

... removed many irrelevant methods

public void run()
{
    byte[] readBuffer = new byte[512 * 1024];
    while (isRunning)
    {
        //ioLogger.debug("in while(isRunning) loop");
        try
        {
            int length = input.available();
            if (length > 0)
            {
                int read = input.read(readBuffer, 0, readBuffer.length);

                if (read < 0)
                {
                    isRunning = false;
                    //@todo: do we disconnect?
                    ioLogger.debug("setting isRunning FALSE after read < 0");
                }
                else
                {
                   //read data and process
                }
            }
            else
            {
                //ioLogger.debug("nothing to read, sleeping");
                try
                {
                    Thread.sleep( 10 );
                }
                catch ( InterruptedException e )
                {
                    //do nothing, keep going
                }
            }
        }
    // some catch blocks and logging after this

I have some worries that calling sleep with this frequency can cause problems and I've tried increasing the sleep time from 10 to 250 just to allay the situation. That does improve matters somewhat, but over time I still end up with the same problem - I steadily leak threads until I am out of heap space.

Does anyone have any insights into this behavior? I wouldn't think that something as basic as Thread.sleep() would cause problems like this.

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What are the supposed mechanics of such a "thread leak"? Thread.sleep() never returning? –  NPE Jan 18 '12 at 17:45
    
I wasn't sure what else to call it when I'm looking at my jconsole thread count, it's climbing at a 30 degree angle for 18 hours. New threads are constantly being created and all of the old ones are stuck at the "waiting on condition" spot I listed above. –  AWT Jan 18 '12 at 17:54
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem isn't with Thread.sleep(), it's with the thread's logic.

From the code that you've posted, the thread will terminate when isRunning = false. Now, the only way for isRunning to be set to false is when input.available() returns a positive value, followed by input.read() returning a negative value.

There doesn't appear to be any state of the world when that would be the case.

As a result, all of the threads using this run() method will live for as long as the process lives, spending most of their time in Thread.sleep().

P.S. This is based on the code that you've posted. If there are ways for isRunning to be set to false that you're not currently showing, please update your question.

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Hi @aix, thanks for the help. Looking through the code, there is no other way for isRunning to be set to false, the only reference to isRunning outside of this code is the declaration. Checking to see if this is by some flawed design or is just a flaw. –  AWT Jan 18 '12 at 19:23
1  
Turns out this was exactly the problem. In my inexperience with Java, I was interpreting the results of my stack trace to think that Thread.sleep() was hanging, when in fact I had many threads that were sleeping indefinitely. I added some error checking, gave the thread a time to live while waiting for data on the network port, and the problem went away. Thanks everyone for the responses. –  AWT Jan 19 '12 at 18:14
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Thread.sleep() is not a problem for sure. It does not create any threads or such.

I can only guess that isRunning is never set (or the change is not visible due to poor synchronization) and new threads are created while old ones are still running.

BTW instead of constantly calling available and sleeping the thread can simply block on input.read(). Code would be much simpler and more responsive.

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I'm looking back up through the code now. I guess what threw me is that all of the threads are all stuck at Thread.sleep(). –  AWT Jan 18 '12 at 17:57
    
+1. My guess is that available always returns 0 for one reason or another (connection reset, for example), and that the thread loops endlessly instead of reading and getting an IOException. available is just unreliable, and it should not be used. –  JB Nizet Jan 18 '12 at 17:58
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Thread.sleep() doesn't "fork" anything and cannot be taken into account while searching about Thread leakage...

You should search for what is producing these threads. Which is the piece of code responsible of creating new threads in your application ? That's the question you'll have to answer first

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Good point. I think I found some interesting stuff, let me sort it out and then I'll post it here. –  AWT Jan 18 '12 at 18:04
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A common mistake to make is to forget to make an isRunning boolean volatile Without this keyword you can change it in one thread and there is no guarantee another thread will see that change. So you could be setting isRunning to false, but the thread continues to run.

To fix the problem I would simplify the code damatically so it does spin around on a variable like this. private volatile boolean closed = false; private final InputStream input;

public void close() throws IOException {
    closed = true;
    input.close();
}

public void run() {
  byte[] readBuffer = new byte[512 * 1024];
  try {
     // you wouldn't keep looping after an exception.
     int len;
     while ((len = input.read(readBuffer)) > 0) {
           //read data and process
     }
  } catch (IOException ioe) {
     if (!closed)
        // log unexpected exception
  }
}

The simpler you make it, the more likely it is to work. ;)

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