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Here's the method I want to test

    private static void selectTop20Tags(Dictionary<string, int> list)
    {

         //Outputs the top 20 most common hashtags in descending order
         foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> pair in list.OrderByDescending(key => key.Value).Take(20))
         {
             Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", pair.Key, pair.Value);
         }

    }

I don't know how I would test this, I've been researching it all day and try various things but cannot get it to work.

I was thinking of including some code such as

#if TEST
            if ((length of list don't know how you would do it) <= 20)
            {
                StreamWriter log2;
                // appends file
                log2 = File.AppendText("logOfTests.txt");
                // Writes to the file
                log2.WriteLine("PASS");
                log2.WriteLine();

                // Closes the stream
                log2.Close();
            }
#endif

I think I just need to see an example and I would know.

share|improve this question
5  
You don't catch an NRE. You prevent it. –  Anthony Pegram Jan 18 '12 at 17:51
3  
Your method is inherently hard to test because it uses Console. Can you pass in a TextWriter instead, perhaps having an overload which uses Console.Out? –  Jon Skeet Jan 18 '12 at 17:53
    
@Anthony Pegram O.k wan't sure of the exception handling either. –  Elliot678 Jan 18 '12 at 17:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would advise learning about Unit Testing. Read this article on MSDN and search on Google for how to write unit tests. They are a great way to test individual units of code and so should be ideal for your situation.

I would also advise separating out UI-related code, such as calls to MessageBox, other UI elements and Console; from the code you wish to test. This will make it much easier to test the logic and execution of your code.

share|improve this answer

I agree with Samuel Slade's answer - understanding Unit Testing and also the principles of Dependency Injection and Inversion of Control will definitely help with testing such systems.

I put together a quick example, which may not be optimal, but at least shows how to write a test against your code (along with some dependency injection) and how you could test to see if your code worked.

I had to make some assumptions, but hopefully it makes sense. Let me know if you have additional questions and I'll try to clarify.

I hope this helps. Good luck!

CodeUnderTest

namespace CodeUnderTest
{
    public interface IMessageBox
    {
        DialogResult Show(string message, string title, MessageBoxButtons buttons, MessageBoxIcon icon);
    }

    public class MessageBoxService : IMessageBox
    {
        public DialogResult Show(string message, string title, MessageBoxButtons buttons, MessageBoxIcon icon)
        {
            return MessageBox.Show(message, title, buttons, icon);
        }
    }

    public class MessageBoxFake : IMessageBox
    {
        public DialogResult Show(string message, string title, MessageBoxButtons buttons, MessageBoxIcon icon)
        {
            return DialogResult.OK;
        }
    }


    public class Repository
    {
        private readonly TextWriter _console;
        private readonly IMessageBox _messageBox;

        public Repository(TextWriter console, IMessageBox msgBox)
        {
            _console = console;
            _messageBox = msgBox;
        }

        public void WriteTop20Tags(Dictionary<string, int> list)
        {
            selectTop20Tags(list, _console, _messageBox);
        }

        private static void selectTop20Tags(Dictionary<string, int> list, TextWriter _console, IMessageBox _messageBox)
        {
            try
            {
                //Outputs the top 20 most common hashtags in descending order
                foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> pair in list.OrderByDescending(key => key.Value).Take(20))
                {
                    _console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", pair.Key, pair.Value);
                }
            }
            catch (NullReferenceException e)
            {
                _messageBox.Show(e.Message, "Error detected", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
            }
        }
    }
}

Unit Test

class When_I_Pass_A_Valid_Dictionary_I_Should_See_My_List_Output_To_My_Writer
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //Arrange
        //dummy data
        var list = new Dictionary<string, int>()
        {
            {"a", 100},
            {"b", 200},
            {"c", 300},
            {"d", 400}
        };

        using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter())
        {
            //Act
            //var repo = new CodeUnderTest.Repository(Console.Out, new CodeUnderTest.MessageBoxFake());
            var repo = new CodeUnderTest.Repository(sw, new CodeUnderTest.MessageBoxFake());
            repo.WriteTop20Tags(list);

            //Assert
            //expect my writer has contents
            if (sw.ToString().Length > 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("success");
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("failed -- string writer was empty!");
            }
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can use Microsoft Moles to simulate the behavior of Console class. Look at the example below.

namespace TestesGerais
{
    public class MyClass
    {
        public static void selectTop20Tags(Dictionary<string, int> list)
        {
            //Outputs the top 20 most common hashtags in descending order
            foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> pair in list.OrderByDescending(key => key.Value).Take(20))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", pair.Key, pair.Value);
            }
        }
    }

    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTest6
    {
        [TestMethod]
        [HostType("Moles")]
        public void TestMethod1()
        {
            // Arrange
            var actual = new List<string>();
            MConsole.WriteLineStringObjectObject = (s, o1, o2) => actual.Add(string.Format(s, o1, o2));
            var dic = new Dictionary<string, int>();
            for (int i = 1; i < 30; i++)
                dic.Add(string.Format("String{0}", i), i);
            var expected = new List<string>();
            expected.AddRange(new[] { "String29, 29", "String28, 28", "String27, 27", "String26, 26", "String25, 25", "String24, 24", "String23, 23", "String22, 22", "String21, 21", "String20, 20", "String19, 19", "String18, 18", "String17, 17", "String16, 16", "String15, 15", "String14, 14", "String13, 13", "String12, 12", "String11, 11", "String10, 10" });
            // Act
            MyClass.selectTop20Tags(dic);
            // Assert
            CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
        }
    }
}

Here, we intercept the calls made to Console so we can evaluate the results. For more information about Moles framework, look at http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/moles/.

However, I agree with the other guys, you should read more about unit tests, isolate your dependencies... We can test your code with Moles, but IMHO, it's not the best way.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - I've heard of Moles, but never used it. Looks interesting, although, I agree with you - it may not be the best way. But it looks useful for some tricky legacy code. –  David Hoerster Jan 18 '12 at 19:08

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