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I'm writing an application in Visual C++ using the .NET 3.5 Framework, connecting to a remote Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2.

However, in order to be able to modify my database connection string without having to recompile constantly, I want to simply save the connection string to a single line text file and load it in during run-time.

Initially, for testing purposes, I had my connection string hardcoded into my query and it worked flawlessly. However, when I implemented a method to read a string in from a text file, I get:

A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL Server. The server was not found or was not accessible. Verify that the instance name is correct and that SQL Server is configured to allow remote connections. (provider: SQL Network Interfaces, error: 26 - Error Locating Server/Instance Specified)

And I have no idea why. I've examined the string the program reads in during run-time and they are identical. Here's the block of code pertaining to this issue:

StreamReader^ read_db_conn_string = File::OpenText(System::IO::Directory::GetCurrentDirectory() + "\\db_conn_string.txt");

            String^ db_conn_string = read_db_conn_string->ReadLine();
            read_db_conn_string->Close();

            bindingSource_Shop->DataSource = GetData("Select * From Shop", db_conn_string);
            dataGridView_Shop->DataSource = bindingSource_Shop;

Here is the GetData method:

    DataTable^ GetData( String^ sqlCommand, String^ connectionString )
   {
      SqlConnection^ Connection = gcnew SqlConnection( connectionString );
      SqlCommand^ command = gcnew SqlCommand( sqlCommand,Connection );
      SqlDataAdapter^ adapter = gcnew SqlDataAdapter();
      adapter->SelectCommand = command;
      DataTable^ table = gcnew DataTable;
      adapter->Fill( table );
      return table;
   }

To keep a working version in my code now, I kept the overloaded GetData method, and if I do it like this, the SQL connection works:

    DataTable^ GetData(String^ sqlCommand)
   {
      String^ connectionString = "Data Source=SERVER\\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=Schedule;Persist Security Info=True;User ID=sa;Password=xxxxx";
      SqlConnection^ Connection = gcnew SqlConnection( connectionString );
      SqlCommand^ command = gcnew SqlCommand( sqlCommand,Connection );
      SqlDataAdapter^ adapter = gcnew SqlDataAdapter();
      adapter->SelectCommand = command;
      DataTable^ table = gcnew DataTable;
      adapter->Fill( table );
      return table;
   }

I'm afraid that it's something really simple, but I just don't have the insight to figure it out.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I notice that you're escaping the backslash in the server name with double-backslash when the connection string is in the code, are you also doing this in the text file? If so, that may be causing the issue, the text file should use normal single backslashes.

Additionally, have you checked whether there is an invisible byte-order-mark at the start of your file (which may be added by some text editors when you save), which is being included in the string you read from it?

You could attempt to open the file in a hex-editor to determine whether there's anything unexpected in the file.

It may be worth using the connectionStrings or appSettings sections of the App.config, rather than reading from a text file, since this is one of the built-in ways to put configurable connection strings in your application.

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The backslash was actually the problem, thank you. I guess I overlooked that because the strings were identical at run-time, so I assumed I was passing the server the right thing. Was scratching my head for quite a while on that, and, like a lot of errors, it's usually a simple thing. –  glace Jan 18 '12 at 18:30
    
@Brett, if this answer solved the problem, you should click the check mark just under its score to the upper left; you'll get both some points and a fancy new Stack Overflow badge! –  Dour High Arch Jan 18 '12 at 20:31

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