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I am doing some detection work using OpenCV, and I need to use the distance transform. Except the distance transform function in opencv gives me an image that is exactly the same as the image I use as source. Anyone know what I am doing wrong? Here is the portion of my code:

cvSetData(depthImage, m_rgbWk, depthImage->widthStep);

//gotten openCV image in "depthImage"           

IplImage *single_channel_depthImage = cvCreateImage(cvSize(320, 240), 8, 1);
cvSplit(depthImage, single_channel_depthImage, NULL, NULL, NULL);

//smoothing
IplImage *smoothed_image = cvCreateImage(cvSize(320, 240), 8, 1);
cvSmooth(single_channel_depthImage, smoothed_image, CV_MEDIAN, 9, 9, 0, 0);

//do canny edge detector
IplImage *edges_image = cvCreateImage(cvSize(320, 240), 8, 1);
cvCanny(smoothed_image, edges_image, 100, 200);

//invert values
IplImage *inverted_edges_image = cvCreateImage(cvSize(320, 240), 8, 1);
cvNot(edges_image, inverted_edges_image);

//calculate the distance transform
IplImage *distance_image = cvCreateImage(cvSize(320, 240), IPL_DEPTH_32F, 1);
cvZero(distance_image);

cvDistTransform(inverted_edges_image, distance_image, CV_DIST_L2, CV_DIST_MASK_PRECISE, NULL, NULL);

In a nutshell, I grad the image from the kinect, turn it into a one channel image, smooth it, run the canny edge detector, invert the values, and then I do the distance transform. But the transformed image looks exactly the same as the input image. What's wrong?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I believe the key here is that they look the same. Here is a small program I wrote to show the difference:

#include <opencv2/core/core.hpp>
#include <opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp>
#include <opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
using namespace cv;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Mat before = imread("qrcode.png", 0);

    Mat dist;
    distanceTransform(before, dist, CV_DIST_L2, 3);

    imshow("before", before);
    imshow("non-normalized", dist);

    normalize(dist, dist, 0.0, 1.0, NORM_MINMAX);
    imshow("normalized", dist);
    waitKey();
    return 0;
}

In the non-normalized image, you see this:
enter image description here

which doesn't really look like it changed anything, but the distance steps are very small compared to the overall range of values [0, 255] (due to imshow converting the image from 32-bit float to 8-bits for display), we can't see the differences, so let's normalize it...

Now we get this:
enter image description here

The values themselves should be correct, but when displayed you will need to normalize the image to see the difference.

EDIT : Here is a small 10x10 sample from the upper-left corner of the dist matrix show that the values are in fact different:

[10.954346, 10.540054, 10.125763, 9.7114716, 9.2971802, 8.8828888, 8.4685974, 8.054306, 7.6400146, 7.6400146;
  10.540054, 9.5850525, 9.1707611, 8.7564697, 8.3421783, 7.927887, 7.5135956, 7.0993042, 6.6850128, 6.6850128;
  10.125763, 9.1707611, 8.2157593, 7.8014679, 7.3871765, 6.9728851, 6.5585938, 6.1443024, 5.730011, 5.730011;
  9.7114716, 8.7564697, 7.8014679, 6.8464661, 6.4321747, 6.0178833, 5.6035919, 5.1893005, 4.7750092, 4.7750092;
  9.2971802, 8.3421783, 7.3871765, 6.4321747, 5.4771729, 5.0628815, 4.6485901, 4.2342987, 3.8200073, 3.8200073;
  8.8828888, 7.927887, 6.9728851, 6.0178833, 5.0628815, 4.1078796, 3.6935883, 3.2792969, 2.8650055, 2.8650055;
  8.4685974, 7.5135956, 6.5585938, 5.6035919, 4.6485901, 3.6935883, 2.7385864, 2.324295, 1.9100037, 1.9100037;
  8.054306, 7.0993042, 6.1443024, 5.1893005, 4.2342987, 3.2792969, 2.324295, 1.3692932, 0.95500183, 0.95500183;
  7.6400146, 6.6850128, 5.730011, 4.7750092, 3.8200073, 2.8650055, 1.9100037, 0.95500183, 0, 0;
  7.6400146, 6.6850128, 5.730011, 4.7750092, 3.8200073, 2.8650055, 1.9100037, 0.95500183, 0, 0]
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Thank you thank you! –  Mina Almasry Jan 18 '12 at 20:56
    
sorry but I have been trying to do this for a while and I can't seem to figure it out. How do you take the sample you just did above? I keep trying to print values in pixels to screen using printf but I just get garbage. How do I print IPL_DEPTH_8U to screen and IPL_DEPTH_32F to screen? Thanks –  Mina Almasry Jan 19 '12 at 22:40
    
asking question –  Mina Almasry Jan 19 '12 at 22:40
    
@MinaAlmasry Actually that question is worthy of a new Stack Overflow post; I don't see it asked, so others in the future might want to know how to do it too!. I'm sure myself or another OpenCV enthusiast will gladly help you answer it. –  mevatron Jan 20 '12 at 14:12
    
@MinaAlmasry And, you'll get more points for it :) –  mevatron Jan 20 '12 at 14:13

I just figured this one out. The OpenCV distanceTransform

Calculates the distance to the closest zero pixel for each pixel of the source image.

and so it expects your edges image to be negative.

All you need to do is to negate your edges image:

edges = 255 - edges;
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You can print this values using this code before normalize function:

for(int x=0; x<10;x++)
  { 
     cout<<endl;
     for(int y=0; y<10;y++)
         cout<<std::setw(10)<<dist.at<float>(x, y);
  }
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