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I'm new to Python (was an IDL user before hand) so I hope that I'm asking this in an understandable way. I've been trying to create a polar plot with x number of bins where the data in the bin is averaged and given a colour associated with that value. This seems to work fine while using the plt.fill command where I can define the bin and then the fill colour. The problem comes when I then try to make a colour bar to go with it. I keep getting errors that state AttributeError: 'Figure' object has no attribute 'autoscale_None'

Any advice would be helpful thanks.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import matplotlib as mpl
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.cm as cm
from matplotlib.pyplot import figure, show, rc, grid
import pylab

r = np.arange(50)/5.
rstep = r[1] - r[0]
theta = np.arange(50)/50.*2.*np.pi
tstep = theta[1] - theta[0]
colorv = np.arange(50)/50.

# force square figure and square axes looks better for polar, IMO
width, height = mpl.rcParams['figure.figsize']
size = min(width, height)
# make a square figure
fig = figure(figsize=(size, size))
ax = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.1, .8, .8])#, polar=True)

my_cmap = cm.jet
for j in range(len(r)):
    rbox = np.array([r[j], r[j], r[j]+ rstep, r[j] + rstep])
    for i in range(len(theta)):
        thetabox = np.array([theta[i], theta[i] + tstep, theta[i] + tstep, theta[i]])
        x = rbox*np.cos(thetabox)
        y = rbox*np.sin(thetabox)
        plt.fill(x,y, facecolor = my_cmap(colorv[j]))



# Add colorbar, make sure to specify tick locations to match desired ticklabels
cbar = fig.colorbar(fig, ticks=[np.min(colorv), np.max(colorv)])
cb = plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

* here is a slightly better example of my real data, there are holes missing everywhere, so in this example I've just made a big one in a quarter of the circle. When I've tried meshing, the code seems to try to interpolate over these regions.

r = np.arange(50)/50.*7. + 3.
rstep = r[1] - r[0]
theta = np.arange(50)/50.*1.5*np.pi - np.pi
tstep = theta[1] - theta[0]
colorv = np.sin(r/10.*np.pi)

# force square figure and square axes looks better for polar, IMO
width, height = mpl.rcParams['figure.figsize']
size = min(width, height)
# make a square figure
fig = figure(figsize=(size, size))
ax = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.1, .8, .8])#, polar=True)

my_cmap = cm.jet

for j in range(len(r)):
    rbox = np.array([r[j], r[j], r[j]+ rstep, r[j] + rstep])
    for i in range(len(theta)):
        thetabox = np.array([theta[i], theta[i] + tstep, theta[i] + tstep, theta[i]])
        x = rbox*np.cos(thetabox)
        y = rbox*np.sin(thetabox)
        plt.fill(x,y, facecolor = my_cmap(colorv[j]))


# Add colorbar, make sure to specify tick locations to match desired ticklabels
#cbar = fig.colorbar(fig, ticks=[np.min(colorv), np.max(colorv)])
#cb = plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

And then with a meshing involved...

from matplotlib.mlab import griddata

r = np.arange(50)/5.
rstep = r[1] - r[0]
theta = np.arange(50)/50.*1.5*np.pi - np.pi
tstep = theta[1] - theta[0]
colorv = np.sin(r/10.*np.pi)

# force square figure and square axes looks better for polar, IMO
width, height = mpl.rcParams['figure.figsize']
size = min(width, height)
# make a square figure
fig = figure(figsize=(size, size))
ax = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.1, .8, .8])#, polar=True)

my_cmap = cm.jet

x = r*np.cos(theta)
y = r*np.sin(theta)
X,Y = np.meshgrid(x,y)

data = griddata(x,y,colorv,X,Y)
cax = plt.contourf(X,Y, data)
plt.colorbar()

# Add colorbar, make sure to specify tick locations to match desired ticklabels
#cbar = fig.colorbar(fig, ticks=[np.min(colorv), np.max(colorv)])
#cb = plt.colorbar()
plt.show()
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2 Answers

colorbar needs things to be an instance of ScalarMappable in order to make a colorbar from them.

Because you're manually setting each tile, there's nothing that essentially has a colorbar.

There are a number of ways to fake it from your colormap, but in this case there's a much simpler solution.

pcolormesh does exactly what you want, and will be much faster.

As an example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# Linspace makes what you're doing _much_ easier (and includes endpoints)
r = np.linspace(0, 10, 50)
theta = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, 50)

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='polar')

# "Grid" r and theta into 2D arrays (see the docs for meshgrid)
r, theta = np.meshgrid(r, theta)
cax = ax.pcolormesh(theta, r, r, edgecolors='black', antialiased=True)

# We could just call `plt.colorbar`, but I prefer to be more explicit
# and pass in the artist that I want it to extract colors from.
fig.colorbar(cax)

plt.show()

enter image description here

Or, if you'd prefer non-polar axes, as in your example code:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

r = np.linspace(0, 10, 50)
theta = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, 50)

# "Grid" r and theta and convert them to cartesian coords...
r, theta = np.meshgrid(r, theta)
x, y = r * np.cos(theta), r * np.sin(theta)

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.axis('equal')

cax = ax.pcolormesh(x, y, r, edgecolors='black', antialiased=True)

fig.colorbar(cax)

plt.show()

enter image description here

Note: If you'd prefer the boundary lines a bit less dark, just specify linewidth=0.5 or something similar to pcolormesh.

Finally, if you did want to directly make the colorbar from the colormap in your original code, you'd create an instance of ScalarMappable from it and pass this to colorbar. It's easier than it sounds, but it's a bit verbose.

As an example, in your original code, if you do something like the following:

cax = cm.ScalarMappable(cmap=my_cmap)
cax.set_array(colorv)
fig.colorbar(cax)

It should do what you want.

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1  
On a side note, the antialiased=True kwarg won't generally be necessary for matplotlib commands (it's the default for most things). pcolormesh defaults to no antiailsing for performance reasons, as the mesh "cells" are often vertical, and look good without antialiasing. In this case, the cells aren't vertical, and the performance hit isn't too bad, so it's a good idea to draw the mesh with antialiasing turned on. –  Joe Kington Jan 18 '12 at 20:15
    
+1, Btw: "There are a number of ways to fake it from your colormap" Please, could you give some hint/example ? I have been trying to get the colorbar from the OP code with no success... –  joaquin Jan 18 '12 at 20:30
    
I was thinking of using a proxy artist, but I think there may be a cleaner way. I'll add an example. –  Joe Kington Jan 18 '12 at 20:35
1  
thanks! very helpful –  joaquin Jan 18 '12 at 21:50
1  
@Alexa Halford - pcolormesh will properly handle missing data if you either a) put in NaN's or b) use a masked array. It should do what you need, I think... –  Joe Kington Jan 18 '12 at 23:28
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

So I've found a workaround. Since I know of a region where I definitely won't have data, I've plotted some there. I've made sure that the data covers the entire range of what I'm potting. I then cover it up (this region was going to be covered anyway, it shows where the "earth" is located). Now I can go ahead and use plt.fill as I had originally and use the colour bar from the randomly potted data. I know this isn't probably the correct way, but it works and doesn't try to interpolate my data.

Thanks so much for helping get this sorted. and if you know of a better way, I'd be happy to hear it!

hid = plt.pcolormesh(X,Y, data, antialiased=True)

#here we cover up the region that we just plotted in
r3 = [1 for i in range(360)]
theta3 = np.arange(360)*np.pi/180.
plt.fill(theta3, r3, 'w')

#now we can go through and fill in all the regions
for j in range(len(r)):
    rbox = np.array([r[j], r[j], r[j]+ rstep, r[j] + rstep])
    for i in range(len(theta)):
        thetabox = np.array([theta[i], theta[i] + tstep, theta[i] + tstep, theta[i]])
        x = rbox*np.cos(thetabox)
        y = rbox*np.sin(thetabox)
        colorv = np.sin(r[j]/10.*np.pi)
        plt.fill(thetabox,rbox, facecolor = my_cmap(colorv))
#And now we can plot the color bar that fits the data Tada :)
plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

Output of above code

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