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I have been programming c/c++ for many years, but todays accidental discovery made me somewhat curious... Why does both outputs produce the same result in the code below? (arr is of course the address of arr[0], i.e. a pointer to arr[0]. I would have expected &arr to be the adress of that pointer, but it has the same value as arr)

  int arr[3];
  cout << arr << endl;
  cout << &arr << endl;

Remark: This question was closed, but now it is opened again. (Thanks ?)

I know that &arr[0] and arr evaluates to the same number, but that is not my question! The question is why &arr and arr evaluates to the same number. If arr is a literal (not stored anyware), then the compiler should complain and say that arr is not an lvalue. If the address of the arr is stored somewhere then &arr should give me the address of that location. (but this is not the case)

if I write

const int* arr2 = arr;

then arr2[i]==arr[i] for any integer i, but &arr2 != arr.

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What does "the address of that pointer" mean? The pointer isn't stored in a variable. –  David Schwartz Jan 18 '12 at 20:07
    
@David Schwartz, If I had written int* arr2 = new int[3], then &arr2 would have been stored in a variable. Maybe arr is a literal constant? But if one take the address of a constant (e.g. &123) then the compiler complains (123 is not an lvalue). The compiler did not complain when I took the address of arr. –  ragnarius Jan 18 '12 at 20:13
4  
I do not think it is a duplicate! –  ragnarius Jan 18 '12 at 20:27
    
Right, so your expectation makes no sense. If it was the address of the pointer, your code wouldn't compile. (Unless you expected it not to compiler. But in that case, how would you pass the address of an array to to other code like the address of any other variable?) –  David Schwartz Jan 18 '12 at 20:54
    
Normal pointers are stored somewhere and I can take the address of a normal pointer to find out where it is stored. I think it makes sense to believe that I can take the address of arr too. Unless it is a literal, but then the compiler would have complained. –  ragnarius Jan 18 '12 at 21:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

They're not the same. They just are at the same memory location.
E.G. You can write arr+2 to get the address of arr[2], but not (&arr)+2 to do the same.
Also, sizeof arr and sizeof &arr are different.

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1  
It's good to note that (&arr)+2 will compile, and maybe even run, but it's undefined behavior, and will not give you arr[2]. –  Mooing Duck Jan 18 '12 at 20:14
    
It won't compile here! cannot convert ‘int (*)[3]’ to ‘int*’ in initialization –  Mr Lister Jan 18 '12 at 20:16
1  
int(*)[3] is convertable to an int** A pointer to an array is convertable to a pointer to a pointer. –  Mooing Duck Jan 18 '12 at 20:23
    
I see. My apologies, I am an idiot. I was trying to assign that to something incompatible in the same statement; just writing (&arr)+2; by itself compiles fine. –  Mr Lister Jan 18 '12 at 20:32
2  
@Mooing: That is wrong, int (*)[3] is not convertible to int**. The pointer-to-array needs the exact size of the inner dimension to know how far to step: ideone.com/iDkB7. –  Xeo Jan 18 '12 at 20:53
#include <cassert>

struct foo {
    int x;
    int y;
};

int main() {    
    foo f;
    void* a = &f.x;
    void* b = &f;
    assert(a == b);
}

For the same reason the two addresses a and b above are the same. The address of an object is the same as the address of its first member (Their types however, are different).

                            arr
                      _______^_______
                     /               \
                    | [0]   [1]   [2] |
--------------------+-----+-----+-----+--------------------------
      some memory   |     |     |     |        more memory
--------------------+-----+-----+-----+--------------------------
                    ^
                    |
           the pointers point here

As you can see in this diagram, the first element of the array is at the same address as the array itself.

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I tried it, but &f.x != &f.y . So the address of an object is only the same as the address of its FIRST member... –  ragnarius Jan 18 '12 at 20:20
1  
@ragnarius: The address of the array is the same as the address of the first element of the array. Has nothing to do with the members of the elements. –  Mooing Duck Jan 18 '12 at 20:27
    
@ragnarius: that's exactly what I said. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 18 '12 at 20:37
    
To bad my question was closed. I know that and array, when type casted to an int, has the same value as the address of the first element. But this was not my question.. –  ragnarius Jan 18 '12 at 20:49

The address is the same but both expressions are different. They just start at the same memory location. The types of both expressions are different.

The value of arr is of type int * and the value of &arr is of type int (*)[3].

& is the address operator and the address of an object is a pointer to that object. The pointer to an object of type int [3] is of type int (*)[3]

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As it happens, the address of the array itself and the address of its first element are numerically the same. But they have different types and behave differently in other respects. –  David Schwartz Jan 18 '12 at 20:11
    
The value of arr is of type int (&)[3] which gets "promoted" to int* since cout doesn't have an overload for arrays. –  Mooing Duck Jan 18 '12 at 20:12

The two have the same value but different types.

When it's used by itself (not the operand of & or sizeof), arr evaluates to a pointer to int holding the address of the first int in the array. &arr evaluates to a pointer to array of three ints, holding the address of the array. Since the first int in the array has to be at the very beginning of the array, those addresses must be equal.

The difference between the two becomes apparent if you do some math on the results:

arr+1 will be equal to arr + sizeof(int).

((&arr) + 1) will be equal to arr + sizeof(arr) == arr + sizeof(int) * 3

Edit: As to how/why this happens, the answer is fairly simple: because the standard says so. In particular, it says (§6.3.2.1/3):

Except when it is the operand of the sizeof operator or the unary & operator, or is a string literal used to initialize an array, an expression that has type ‘‘array of type’’ is converted to an expression with type ‘‘pointer to type’’ that points to the initial element of the array object and is not an lvalue.

[note: this particular quote is from the C99 standard, but I believe there's equivalent language in all versions of both the C and C++ standards].

In the first case (arr by itself), arr is not being used as the operand of sizeof, unary &, etc., so it is converted (not promoted) to the type "pointer to type" (in this case, "pointer to int").

In the second case (&arr), the name obviously is being used as the operand of the unary & operator -- so that conversion does not take place.

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@MooingDuck: Where do you (think you) see anything related to the address of a pointer? (hint: there's no such thing here). There's no promotion involved here either. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 18 '12 at 20:16
    
you state that arr "yields" a pointer to int, which is ambiguous, and possibly misleading. –  Mooing Duck Jan 18 '12 at 20:25
    
I am not sure I understand your quote. We are discussing the unary & operator and your quote says that "Except it is the [...] unary & operator...". –  ragnarius Jan 20 '12 at 18:02

Pointers and arrays can often be treated identically, but there are differences. A pointer does have a memory location, so you can take the address of a pointer. But an array has nothing pointing to it, at runtime. So taking the address of an array is, to the compiler, syntactically defined to be the same as the address of the first element. Which makes sense, reading that sentence aloud.

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They are not the same.

A bit more strict explanation:

arr is an lvalue of type int [3]. An attempt to use arr in some expressions like cout << arr will result in lvalue-to-rvalue conversion which, as there are no rvalues of array type, will convert it to an rvalue of type int * and with the value equal to &arr[0]. This is what you can display.

&arr is an rvalue of type int (*)[3], pointing to the array object itself. No magic here :-) This pointer points to the same address as &arr[0] because the array object and its first member start in the exact same place in the memory. That's why you have the same result when printing them.


An easy way to confirm that they are different is comparing *(arr) and *(&arr): the first is an lvalue of type int and the second is an lvalue of type int[3].

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