Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm learning about ternary operators now. I got the basics down, but then I saw this snippet and it doesn't make any sense to me. Can anyone please explain how is it put together?!

b.m & 4 || (c |= 2, 63 <= a && 77 >= a ? a = 65 : 48 <= a && 57 >= a ? a = 48 : c & 1 ? 97 <= a && 122 >= a ? a = 65 : 197 == a || 229 == a ? c &= 5 : 192 <= a && 687 >= a ? a = 192 : 1536 <= a ? a = 1536 : 912 <= a ? a = 912 : 160 <= a ? a = 160 : 127 <= a ? c &= 5 : 33 <= a ? a = 59 : c &= 5 : 48 > a ? c &= 5 : 65 > a ? a = 59 : 96 > a ? c &= 5 : 112 > a ? a = 96 : 187 > a ? c &= 5 : a = 59);

b.m & 4 || are bit operations as far as I understood, then (c |= 2, another bit operation, but what does comma mean?!

Then there's 63 <= a && 77 >= a ? a = 65 : 48

which translates to

if(a >= 63 && a <= 77){ a = 65 } else { a = 48; }

and then after that comes <= a && 57 >= a ? a = 48 : c & 1 ? 97 <= a which doesn't make any sense to me at all. because 48 was for the previous statement. Can anyone

share|improve this question
    
man that's a long operation. headache just looking at it. all I can help you with is the comma operator. –  Matt K Jan 18 '12 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Comma is a separate operator in javascript:

The comma operator evaluates both of its operands (from left to right) and returns the value of the second operand.

You have grasped just a part of expression:

Then there's 63 <= a && 77 >= a ? a = 65 : 48

Actually it is a little bit longer (with some formatting):

63 <= a && 77 >= a
    ? a = 65
    : 48 <= a && 57 >= a
        ? a = 48
        : c & 1
            ? 97 <= a && 122 >= a
                ? a = 65
                : 197 == a || 229 == a
                    ? c &= 5
                    : 192 <= a && 687 >= a
                        ? a = 192
                        : 1536 <= a
                            ? a = 1536
                            : 912 <= a
                                ? a = 912
                                : 160 <= a
                                    ? a = 160
                                    : 127 <= a
                                        ? c &= 5
                                        : 33 <= a
                                            ? a = 59
                                            : c &= 5
            : 48 > a
                ? c &= 5
                : 65 > a
                    ? a = 59
                    : 96 > a
                        ? c &= 5
                        : 112 > a
                            ? a = 96
                            : 187 > a
                                ? c &= 5
                                : a = 59

Trying to rewrite it in if-else fasion will yield the following result:

if (63 <= a && 77 >= a){
    a = 65
} else if (48 <= a && 57 >= a){
    a = 48
} else if (c & 1){
    if (97 <= a && 122 >= a){
        a = 65
    } else if (197 == a || 229 == a){
        c &= 5
    } else if (192 <= a && 687 >= a){
        a = 192
    } else if (1536 <= a){
        a = 1536
    } else if (912 <= a){
        a = 912
    } else if (160 <= a){
        a = 160
    } else if (127 <= a){
        c &= 5
    } else if (33 <= a){
        a = 59
    } else {
        c &= 5
    }               
} else {
    if (48 > a){
        c &= 5
    } else if (65 > a){
        a = 59
    } else if (96 > a){
        c &= 5
    } else if (112 > a){
        a = 96
    } else if (187 > a){
        c &= 5
    } else {
        a = 59
    }
}

Please, pay attention that if-else approach lacks returning value currently, whereas ternary operator does return the value of the last operator executed (this may affect the overall value of boolean expression in parentheses).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much!! Yeah i was just trying to understand the beginning, but now it's much easier to understand, thank you!!! –  user1002194 Jan 18 '12 at 20:40

The comma isn't a ternary operator, it allows two expressions to replace one.

But more importantly, that's a mess. Break it down, format it, and comment it. Unless you're golfing, combining all of that into one pile is just abusive.

share|improve this answer

I prefer to format nested ternary statements like this, so they have a simple, readable structure:

//   (is this true) ? then do this  
//   (is this true) ? then do this  
// (all else fails) : then do this

Following that structure, it would look something like this:

  63 <= a && 77 >= a ? a = 65
: 48 <= a && 57 >= a ? a = 48
:              c & 1 ? /* then go into this indented block below */
                         97 <= a && 122 >= a ? a = 65
:                       197 == a || 229 == a ? c &= 5
:                       192 <= a && 687 >= a ? a = 192
:                                  1536 <= a ? a = 1536
:                                   912 <= a ? a = 912
:                                   160 <= a ? a = 160
:                                   127 <= a ? c &= 5
:                                    33 <= a ? a = 59
                                  /* else */ : c &= 5
:            48 > a ? c &= 5
:            65 > a ? a = 59
:            96 > a ? c &= 5
:           112 > a ? a = 96
:           187 > a ? c &= 5
   /* final else */ : a = 59
share|improve this answer
    
nice, thanks man! –  user1002194 Jan 18 '12 at 21:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.