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I'm writing windows service which will process "something" every couple minutes.

Here is some code:

public Service()
        {
            this.InitializeComponent();
            this.ServiceName = Name;
            this.CanPauseAndContinue = true;
            this.CanShutdown = true;

            this.eventLog.Source = Name;

            // initialize timer
            this.timer.Elapsed += this.TimerElapsed;
        }

        private void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            eventLog.WriteEntry("Starting syncronization...", EventLogEntryType.Information);

            if (this.processor.PrepareToRun())
            {
                this.processor.Run();
            }
        }

I wonder what will happen if this.processor.Run() will take long time and next TimerElapsed event will be raised? Will it skip? Will it wait and run ASAP after finished? Should I consider those scenarios and code for them?

I'm using System.Timers.Timer

EDIT:

private void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            eventLog.WriteEntry("Starting syncronization...", EventLogEntryType.Information);

            try
            {
                this.timer.Stop();
                if (this.processor.PrepareToRun())
                {
                    this.processor.Run();
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                LoggingAndNotifications.LogAndNotify(ex);

            }
            finally
            {
                this.timer.Start();
            }
        }

EDIT 2

public Service()
        {
            this.InitializeComponent();
            this.ServiceName = Name;
            this.CanPauseAndContinue = true;
            this.CanShutdown = true;

            this.eventLog.Source = Name;

            // initialize timer
            this.timer.AutoReset = false;
            this.timer.Elapsed += this.TimerElapsed;
        }

        private void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            eventLog.WriteEntry("Starting syncronization...", EventLogEntryType.Information);

            try
            {
                if (this.processor.PrepareToRun())
                {
                    this.processor.Run();
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                LoggingAndNotifications.LogAndNotify(ex);
                throw;
            }
            finally
            {
                this.timer.Start();
            }
        }
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It'll call it again on another thread.

Depending on the nature of the operation you will want to either:

  1. Ignore this, if the code called is safe for multiple simultaneous calls then this may be fine. Of course, you have to know that it's fine.
  2. Lock on the timer-triggered operation. Be aware that you can end up with a queue of lots of pending operations, which is very bad.
  3. Lock on the timer-triggered operation, try to obtain the lock with a timeout of zero and if you fail then skip it - there's a thread still here from the last time.
  4. Have the timer as a one-off timer that you restart at the end of each call.
share|improve this answer
    
I like #4 for my specific situation. Is my Edit (in original post) look correct if I want that scenario? –  katit Jan 18 '12 at 20:56
3  
Stopping the timer won't help, the Elapsed event handler call can be delayed if there are a lot of active TP threads in the process. Set the AutoReset property to false instead. –  Hans Passant Jan 18 '12 at 21:01
    
I'd be very cautious of 2. 1 either clearly works or not, but is great when you really need it every X minutes. The difference between 3 and 4 is between "every x minutes with some skipped" and "every x minutes after the last finished". Both have their place and often either is fine. You don't need to .Stop() the timer, it's easier and safer (just in cases some freaky cases means you didn't even get that far) to have it not auto-reset in the first place. Set AutoReset to false, or use a System.Threading.Timer with Timeout.Infinite period. –  Jon Hanna Jan 18 '12 at 21:07
    
@HansPassant Yes, one should always assume the answer to any question beginning with "could this thread possibly be so fast or so slow that..." is "yes". :) –  Jon Hanna Jan 18 '12 at 21:08
    
Ok, how does it look in #2? If I understood correctly - I need to set AutoReset=false and then every time I call Start() it will raise event once when time elapsed. First start not visible in my code - I call it when service starts. Does this look correct? –  katit Jan 18 '12 at 21:16

You can see what will happen with this sample app:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer(2000);
        timer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedObject);
        timer.Start();

        while (true)
        {
        }

    }

    static void OnTimedObject(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("entered");
        Thread.Sleep(3000);
        Console.WriteLine("exited");

    }
}

You'll see two 'entered' strings show up before the 'exited' first shows up. It will continue. So the threads won't step on each other.

(BTW, I'm not advocating infinite loops. :) )

share|improve this answer
    
No reason not to advocate an infinite loop. The few cases where a deliberate one has its place (e.g. windows message pump) are the few cases where the deliberate ones have their case, and the rest are clearly bugs and not in the "might seem like a good idea so don't advocate it" camp. –  Jon Hanna Jan 20 '12 at 0:46

I use the following if I don't want subsequent timer firings to execute the method again before it's completed:

private void TimerFired(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e) {
    // only execute the code within this method if we are able to
    // get a lock. This will ensure that any Timer firings will be
    // ignored that occur while we're already doing work (OnTimer) 
    if (Monitor.TryEnter(lockObj)) {
        try {
            // do work here
        } finally {
            Monitor.Exit(lockObj);
        }
    }
}

otherwise, if the method could have a duration longer than the timer interval, the method could end up starting executing on a different thread before the first is finished.

share|improve this answer
    
In your case if method duration is longer than timer interval you'll end up with lot of waits and method will be executed constantly. –  the_joric Jan 18 '12 at 22:12
    
@the_joric - I don't think that's true. TryEnter is not a blocking method, and returns immediately, returning either true or false. If it gets the lock, it executes the work inside. If it doesn't, the TimerFired method exits quickly without doing any work. –  hatchet Jan 18 '12 at 22:48
    
yes, you are correct -- my fault :) –  the_joric Jan 19 '12 at 16:20
1  
@the_joric TryEnter does have a blocking variant with a timeout that will block for a given interval, which may be what you were thinking of. –  Jon Hanna Jan 22 '12 at 18:54

When timer event is raised, timer code is scheduled for execution on thread pool. Most likely it will be executed in another thread but it depends on different factors (# of processors, thread utilization etc.). However it has nothing with timers -- it's thread pool's duty.

Personally I never use timer interval. I setup timer to run once and after my code is executed setup it again. Thus I ensure that code is executed only in single thread.

share|improve this answer

I have done this to handle such scenarios. Off-course you need to tweak it for exceptional cases like multi-threaded actions.

    public Service()
    {
        bool _IsProcessRunning = false;
        this.InitializeComponent();
        this.ServiceName = Name;
        this.CanPauseAndContinue = true;
        this.CanShutdown = true;

        this.eventLog.Source = Name;

        // initialize timer
        this.timer.Elapsed += this.TimerElapsed;
    }

    private void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        if(!_IsProcessRunning)
        {
            DoSomething();
        }           
    }

    private void DoSomething()
    {
        try
        {
             _IsProcessRunning = true;

             // Do our stuff here
        }
        catch(Exception Ex)
        {               
        }
        finally
        {
             _IsProcessRunning = false;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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