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I am trying to print out a message. If a word in dictionary is not found then it should print out a message instead of giving an error. What I thought is

if bool(bool(dictionary[word])) == True:
    return dictionary[word]
else:
    print 'wrong'

but it does not work when I write something that is not in dictionary instead it gives something like this

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#34>", line 1, in <module>
    translate_word('hous')
  File "H:\IND104\final\Project 4 - Italian-Spanish Translator\trial 1.py", line 21, in translate_word
    if bool(bool(dictionary[word])) == True:
KeyError: 'hous' 

So how can I print out an error message thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
You should never do bool(bool(x)) == True. Just x. – Fred Foo Jan 18 '12 at 20:42
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way to achieve what you want is a try/except block:

try:
    return dictionary[word]
except KeyError:
    print 'wrong'
    return None
share|improve this answer
    
after I use this one it also continues to read rest of the lines, how can I stop reading the rest of it after I use this one? – Sarp Kaya Jan 18 '12 at 21:16
    
@Sarp that's a different question – David Heffernan Jan 18 '12 at 22:45

You need to use the in operator to test whether or not a key is in the dictionary. With your variable names this becomes:

if word in dictionary:

If you wish to check for the presence of the key and retrieve the value in one go you can use the get() method:

value = dictionary.get(word)
if value is not None:
    ...

You can supply your own default value to get() which is returned if the key is not found. Then you could write your code like this:

print dictionary.get(word, 'wrong')
share|improve this answer
2  
is not is also an operator: if value is not None – chepner Jan 18 '12 at 22:40
    
@chepner Sorry, I'm not fluent in Python! – David Heffernan Jan 18 '12 at 23:17
    
Just FYI :) It is odd in that it is two words and requires special language support. After all, you can't compose not with anything else (you couldn't say not <, not ==, etc.) – chepner Jan 18 '12 at 23:33
if word in dictionary:
    return dictionary[word]
else:
    print("wrong")
share|improve this answer
    
after I use this one it also continues to read rest of the lines, how can I stop reading the rest of it after I use this one? – Sarp Kaya Jan 18 '12 at 21:18
    
@SarpKaya: are you doing this in a loop? Then use break. – Fred Foo Jan 18 '12 at 21:41
    
no not in the loop – Sarp Kaya Jan 18 '12 at 22:10

Indexing a dictionary assumes that the key is already there, in order to test if the key is in the dictionary, try this:

#Check to see if a key is in a dictionary
dictionary = {'key' : 123}
if 'key' in dictionary:
 #Do something
else:
 #Do something else

The [key] in [dictionary] is now the favoured syntax over the previous has_key([key]) dictionary method: reference

share|improve this answer

Time to learn some exception handling:

try:
    some_stuff()
except:
    print "Sorry, an error occured"
share|improve this answer

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