Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need an algorithm to select the kth largest or smallest value. The values will be ints. My instructor told me to use a modified partition algorithm to find the kth largest or smallest value. Any thoughts?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by BЈовић, Hristo Iliev, Andrey, kapa, gnat Oct 18 '12 at 9:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Google for "partition sort algorithm" –  anon May 21 '09 at 7:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following is a description of the quickselect algorithm. I will assume that you want to find the kth smallest value.

  1. Take the first element of your array. This will be your pivot. Keep track of its position.

  2. Partition the array based on this pivot. Elements smaller than your pivot go before your pivot in the array; larger, after your pivot. (This step will move your pivot. Keep track of its position in your array.)

  3. You now know that your pivot is larger than pivot_position number of elements. Therefore, your pivot is the (pivot_position + 1)th smallest element.

    • If k is equal to pivot_position + 1, then you've found your kth smallest value. Congratulations, return pivot_position as the position of that value in the array.

    • If k is less than pivot_position + 1, you want some value that's smaller than your pivot. Look in the part of the array before your pivot for the kth smallest value.

    • If k is greater than pivot_position + 1, you want some value that's larger than your pivot. Look in the part of the array after your pivot for the k - (pivot_position + 1)th smallest value (since that part of the array excludes the (pivot_position + 1) smallest values).

Since you're using C++, you should probably implement your functions as follows:

int select(int *array, int left, int right, int k);
int partition(int *array, int left, int right, int pivot_position);

select takes your array, left and right bounds, and your k. To clarify, array[left] will be the first element; array[right] will be the last; right - left + 1 will be the length of the array. select returns the position of the kth smallest element.

partition takes your array, left and right bounds, and the starting position of your pivot. It's safe to just pass 0 for pivot_position every time, meaning that you want to use the first element in the array as the pivot. (In a variation called randomized quickselect, you pick a random pivot_position.) partition returns the position of the pivot after you're done moving things around.

share|improve this answer

The STL has a partial_sort function that will sort the first k items of a sequence, and allowing you to grab that item with a simple lookup.

In other words, look for std::partial_sort and the rest will be obvious.

There is also a nth_element function in the STL. I'm sure you can figure out how to use it.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.