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How do I rewrite this script in Korn Shell? It's in Bash right? I'm a little confused to the actual differences between all the shells... Am I on the right track to converting it to Korn Shell?

usage ()
{
     echo      "usage: ./file.sk user"
}
# test if we have two arguments on the command line
if [[ $# != 1 ]]
then
    usage
    exit
fi

# Search for user
fullname=$(cut -f1 -d: /etc/passwd | grep "$1")
if [[ $? -eq 0 ]]; then
                echo "User already found:"
                grep $1 /etc/passwd
        exit
        else
                #get numbers
                cat /etc/passwd | gawk -F: '{print $3}' | sort -n > currentuid4
                #get last number
                last=`tail -1 currentuid4`
                echo last $last
                #add +1
                newuid=`expr $last + 1`
                #print it
                echo "ADDED: $1 with UID: $newuid"
        exit
fi
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A quick test and the constructs (if...fi, $(...) seem to work in ksh, have you tried it? –  Kevin Jan 18 '12 at 22:06
    
Did you try just changing the shebang line at the top to #!/bin/ksh ? I don't see anything that is obviously bash-specific. It should work, or with set -vx, you should be able to fix it in 5 mins. Good luck. –  shellter Jan 18 '12 at 22:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I suggest replacing [[ ... ]] by [ ... ] and using -eq/-ne to make the script more portable on different shells.

usage ()
{
     echo      "usage: ./file.sk user"
}
# test if we have two arguments on the command line                                                                                                            
if [ "$#" -ne 1 ]
then
    usage
    exit
fi

# Search for user                                                                                                                                              
fullname=$(cut -f1 -d: /etc/passwd | grep "$1")
if [ "$?" -eq 0 ]; then
                echo "User already found:"
                grep $1 /etc/passwd
        exit
        else
                #get numbers                                                                                                                                   
                cat /etc/passwd | gawk -F: '{print $3}' | sort -n > currentuid4
                #get last number                                                                                                                               
                last=`tail -1 currentuid4`
                echo last $last
                #add +1                                                                                                                                        
                newuid=`expr $last + 1`
                #print it                                                                                                                                      
                echo "ADDED: $1 with UID: $newuid"
        exit
fi
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2  
Sorry, '[[ ... ]]' has always been supported in ksh. See ksh88 doc: www2.research.att.com/sw/download/man/man1/ksh88.html AND ksh93 doc : www2.research.att.com/sw/download/man/man1/ksh.html . Just search for '[['. Good luck to all. –  shellter Jan 18 '12 at 22:21
    
How did this wind up as a community wiki after only 19 minutes after posting? Is this a new philosphy for S.O. Just curious, haven't seen this happen before. –  shellter Jan 18 '12 at 22:23
    
That's not true. The Kornshell has [[ and ]] tests. There's nothing in this particular script that's Kornshell incompatible. I successfully ran the script in both Bash and Kornshell. The only thing I'll comment on is the script claims to add a user, but doesn't –  David W. Jan 18 '12 at 22:30
    
Ok [[ is also supported by ksh. But I mean [[ is less portable than [. @shellter I have decided on my own to share the answer as community wiki –  olibre Jan 18 '12 at 22:35

This script is completely Kornshell compatible as written. You don't have to do a thing to it.

Kornshell and Bash do differ, but in very few places. The most common ones are:

  • Kornshells have print and Bash doesn't. However both have printf.
  • Kornshell and Bash differ in the way typeset works. Kornshell has a much richer syntax. Bash uses other commands to do the same thing.
  • Bash has a richer set of command line features. Kornshell and Bash both have set -o to set options, but Bash also has the shopt settings. And, Bash has better prompt syntax. You won't believe what I have to go through to set my Kornshell prompt to do what PS="\u@\h:\w$ " does in Bash.
  • I believe there's some differences in arithmetic handling too. I just can't think of it right off the top of my head.

This script, by the way, doesn't add a user to the /etc/passwd file as it claims when you give it a new user.

share|improve this answer
    
Yea, it's more of a dummy script/example. –  mike adams Jan 18 '12 at 23:03
    
Ksh supports floating point arithmetic, but Bash doesn't. Both have echo but printf is preferred. +1 –  Dennis Williamson Jan 18 '12 at 23:06

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