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public abstract class Parent {

    private Parent peer;

    public Parent() {
        peer = new ??????("to call overloaded constructor");
    }

    public Parent(String someString) {
    }

}

public class Child1 extends parent {

}

public class Child2 extends parent {

}

When I construct an instance of Child1, I want a "peer" to automatically be constructed which is also of type Child1, and be stored in the peer property. Likewise for Child2, with a peer of type Child2.

The problem is, on the assignment of the peer property in the parent class. I can't construct a new Child class by calling new Child1() because then it wouldn't work for Child2. How can I do this? Is there a keyword that I can use that would refer to the child class? Something like new self()?

share|improve this question
1  
Seems like a strange pattern to me. Might you be better off using a "ParentFactory" to instantiate these objects? – Harry Lime May 21 '09 at 8:09
    
That is a very weird design. The peer of the peer would be the original object, I suppose? – Thilo May 21 '09 at 8:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted
public abstract class Parent implements Clonable{

  private Object peer;

  // Example 1 
  public Parent() {
    try {
      peer = this.clone();
    } catch (CloneNotSupportedException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }

  // Example 2
  public Parent(String name) {
    try {
      peer = this.getClass().getConstructor(String.class).newInstance(name);
    } catch (Exception e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
  } 

  public <T extends Parent> T getPeer() {
    return (T)peer;
  }
}

public class Child01 extends Parent { }

public class Child02 extends Parent { }

It seems that the code may be more simple.

share|improve this answer
1  
But he wants "peer" to be a new object, not "this" – Harry Lime May 21 '09 at 9:46
    
... a new object, whose peer in turn is "this". – Thilo May 21 '09 at 9:50

I'm not sure if it is possible to do this without running into cycles. I am convinced that it would be a lot clearer to write this using factory methods instead of constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, definitely shouldn't use constructors directly. – egaga May 21 '09 at 9:59
    
...But isn't a factory method a workaround pattern for this not being possible in the language, really? – xtofl May 21 '09 at 19:13

I'll start by saying that I think it's probably a really bad design. And the class names are also bad, but I'll stick with them.

However, one way of dealing with it:

public abstract class Parent {
    interface PeerFactory {
        Parent create(Parent peer);
    }
    private final Parent peer;

    protected Parent(Parent peer) {
        super();
        this.peer = peer;
    }
    protected Parent(PeerFactory peerFactory) {
        super();
        this.peer = peerFactory.create(this);
    }
}

public class Child1 extends parent {
    private static final PeerFactory peerFactory = new PeerFactory {
        public Parent create(Parent peer) {
            return new Child1(peer);
         }
    };
    public Child1() {
        super(peerFactory);
    } 
    private Child1(Peer peer) {
        super(peer);
    }   
}
share|improve this answer

Something like this:

public class Peer {
    public static abstract class Parent {
            private Parent peer;

            protected Parent(boolean needPeer) {
                    if (needPeer) {
                            try {
                                    peer = getClass().newInstance();
                            }
                            catch (Throwable e) {
                                    System.err.println(e);
                            }
                    }
            }

            public String getPeerClass() {
                    return peer.getClass().toString();
            }
    }

    public static class Child1 extends Parent {
            public Child1() {
                    this(false);
            }
            public Child1(boolean needPeer) {
                    super(needPeer);
            }
    }

    public static class Child2 extends Parent {
            public Child2() {
                    this(false);
            }
            public Child2(boolean needPeer) {
                    super(needPeer);
            }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
            Parent p1 = new Child1(true);
            Parent p2 = new Child2(true);

            System.out.println(p1.getPeerClass());
            System.out.println(p2.getPeerClass());
    }
}

This one works with default constructor, there's a bit more trickery involved if you want to construct a new peer with a non-default constructor. See The javadoc for Class.

Edit: fixed the infinite recursion :)

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. This seems like an ok solution. I wonder if the issue Thilo raised would apply here, or is that why you have used inner classes? – Joel May 21 '09 at 8:12
    
Does not this also create infinite recursion in the constructors? Class.newInstance() still calls the constructor. – Thilo May 21 '09 at 8:21
    
rather than "boolean needPeer = false" (no peer), I suppose the peer's peer should be the original object... The OP should rethink his design. – Thilo May 21 '09 at 8:25
    
I only used inner classes so that I could test it with just one java file :) See my comment to his answer about the other issue. (the getClass() call in Parent's ctor is not really "nice", but that's how java works shrug.) – mitchnull May 21 '09 at 8:25
2  
Rethinking the design sounds good advice, too :) – mitchnull May 21 '09 at 8:27

Note that without an accessor in the parent class you cannot get the peer object (you cannot instantiate Parent), so this design only makes sense as concept proof.

share|improve this answer

I would suggest replacing this whole thing with a Factory pattern, where you have complete control over what gets a peer added and you don't have to do it in the constructor.

share|improve this answer
public abstract class Parent implements Clonable {
  private Object peer;

  // Example 1 
  public Parent() {
    try {
      peer = this.clone();
    } catch (CloneNotSupportedException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }

  // Example 2
  public Parent(String name) {
    try {
      peer = this.getClass().getConstructor(String.class).newInstance(name);
    } catch (Exception e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }

} 

public <T extends Parent> T getPeer() {
 return (T)peer;
}

public class Child01 extends Parent { }

public class Child02 extends Parent { }
share|improve this answer
public abstract class Parent {

    private Parent peer;

    public Parent(Parent peer) {
        this.peer = peer;
    }

    public Parent(String someString) {
    }

}

public class Child1 extends parent {
    public Child1() {
        super(new Child1())
    }
}

public class Child2 extends parent {
    public Child2() {
        super(new Child2())
    }
}

Here's the simplest way I can think of. You could probably do it in the parent class using some of the java reflection API though (so ask the 'this' reference what class it is and construct a new class of that type. It may not work depending on how java constructors work though. In C++, the 'this' pointer in a constructor is of the same type as the constructors class)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah. That's what I was hoping to avoid, but I might have to have go that. Cheers – Joel May 21 '09 at 8:06
8  
Aren't the Child1() and Child2() constructors calling themselves infinitely? – banjollity May 21 '09 at 8:08
    
So they are... oops – workmad3 May 21 '09 at 12:38

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