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[Updated]: See my answer below.

I'm probably not going to explain this very well, but I'm going to give it a whirl anyway because this has been wrecking my mind:

A simple explanation of the goal: I want to design a parent/child relationship that, starting with parent, will allow for a group/sub-group to have one or more of:

  1. a sub_group,
  2. a single unique group item with no children, or
  3. a reference to a shared list of items (see below).

The wall I've hit: I know that I can do a basic parent/child relationship inside a single table with a parent_id column, but the problem with that is many of my parent/child groups will share some of the same information (a "list") and entering and maintaing those sub-items/groups in duplicate would become really tedious. What I would like to have is best depicted by the following diagram and explanation:

Groups |  Shared Lists   |  Unique Lists
-------|-----------------|--------------
Studs  |                 |  StudType
     \ |                 | /
       > Widths > Gauges >
     / |                 | \
Track  |                 |  TrackType

Explanation (leave a comment if this doesn't make sense):

  • I have two canonical parents: Studs and Track.
  • I have a four lists: Widths, Gauges, StudType and TrackType.
  • BOTH Stud and Track share the same Widths list.
  • EACH item in Widths shares the same Gauges list.
  • EACH item in Gauges which was referenced from the Studs group will reference the StudType list.
  • EACH item in Gauges which was referenced from the Track group will reference the TrackType list.

(Note: I realize I could start specific and move to shared lists as I drill down (i.e Studs>StudType>Widths>Gauges), but for the purposes of this, I'd like to assume the explanation/diagram above is how it has to be done.)

My Question(s) [updated]: Is this even the right way to think about my duplicate entry problem? Am I on the right track or way off base here? Does anybody have any suggestions on how I should implement/re-think this? Assuming the design is right, how, if feasable, could I reference one combination at a time even though they essentially exist only in a virtual relationship? I would greatly appreciate any help/direction with my situation.

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Does not each stud type have a constant, immutable width? A constant, immutable gauge? Same with track type? If so, that would simplify your problem considerably. –  Pete Wilson Jan 18 '12 at 22:21
    
Each stud will be one of a set of Widths (track, too), and each width will be one of a set of Gauges. But my thinking is that I would like a design that let's me solve similar relationship problems. For instance... I can have Sheathing with varying widths and varying types as well. I would prefer not to hardcode these relationships, but design a storage system that allows for them. –  bschaeffer Jan 18 '12 at 22:37
    
Yes, but I was asking about stud types. If a stud is of Type A, then can you count on it being of width, say, 2.5 inches? Do all studs of Type A have widths 2.5 in.? Or is it that all studs of Type A are white oak and any of these can have any width? IOW, what distinguishes a "type" of stud? Of track? –  Pete Wilson Jan 18 '12 at 22:46
    
Ooops.... sorry. For example: A Stud can be one of [2.5, 3, 6, 6.5] inches wide, each of which can be one of [25ga, 20ga, 18ga DW, 18ga CSJ], each of which can be [punched, unpunched]. –  bschaeffer Jan 18 '12 at 23:06
    
I also updated my question... because what I really want to do is how to reference a each possible combination even though they essentially exist as virtual combinations. –  bschaeffer Jan 18 '12 at 23:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All the following is my opinion, but it's good practice: OK, it finally got through to me what you're getting at. Yes, there could be an O-O (i.e., parent-child) character to the inventory, or parts list, or whatever collection of items you're trying to keep track of: every item has-a gauge, has-a grade, has-a width, has-a material, has-a punched/not-punched, has-a length, has-a finish, and so on right through the list of possible attributes for any item, including stud, track, #2 pine plank, piece of sheet rock. and on and on. And the parent-child relationship you want to establish is elegant and concise.

But if you set out to try explicitly to express this parent-child relationship in database tables you are in for trouble and you'll end up redesigning the database very soon. You can, however, show this relationship implicitly in your database tables.

However, the way you have it isn't going to work because you are missing the one required piece of unique data that every item must have and that will be the one and only unique key into whatever tables you decide on. That piece of data is SKU. You need SKU to discriminate an item from all other items. Like I say, every item has a unique SKU and if it doesn't have one now then you have to invent one, otherwise it'll be a nightmare: it won't work.

So your main table should be something like this:

  SKU  Name   length  width   On-hand   Reorder-level   Supplier
------------+-------+-------+---------+---------------+--------------- 
  321  stud    6'     2.5      21          4           Studs 'R' Us
  654  stud    8'     3.5      10          8           Studs and More        
  987  stud   10'     2.5      15         10           All Metal Stuff
  101  track  10'     1.0      45         25           Try Us First
  111  track  12'     1.5      22         15           Main St. Track
------------+-------+-------+---------+---------------+--------------- 

Your gauge table (not just gauge, though) might be:

  SKU         Gauge   Type     Finish   Application  
------------+-------+--------+--------+------------- 
 321          .05    Normal    shiny     Outdoor    
 654          .05    Normal    dull      Out/In   
 987          .08    Light     paint     Indoor
 101          .08    HvyDuty   dull      Outdoor
 111          .60    Normal    shiny     Out/In

You might also want a max-load field for when the customer calls and asks "how many fixtures can I hang per 4-foot length of track?"

Maybe you want a price table:

  SKU          Qty    Price  
------------+-------+-------- 
 321          each      3.50    
 321            25     86.00    
 321           100    330.00    
 654          each      3.15  
 987          each      2.75
 101          each      4.25
 111           100     46.75

Something like that. The point is that the main key into each table is SKU, and you can have as many tables as you want as long as each row in each table carries its unique SKU field.

Now you can apply a parent-child relationship by SELECTing from one or more (as many as you like) tables by whatever fields you like, e.g.: give me all shiny-finish studs that cost less than five bucks each in single quantities. Or show me all studs of gauge .08 or less. Or [stop me before I bore everybody!] maybe "show me all of SKUs and Names of items whose on-hand quantity is less than or equal to reorder-level quantity."

Same with tracks.

That's how any journeyman database designer would do it and that layout has the further virtue that it is "normalized" (google it). You have to do it something like that.

Good luck!

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like the easiest solution to my problem. It's not exactly what I had in mind (I am not necessarily tracking inventory), so I wanted to get your input into an alternative solution I came up which would (I think) allow for the kinds of things I think I want. If you have time, please look at the answer I posted. I'd really appreciate it. –  bschaeffer Jan 19 '12 at 17:42
    
@bschaeffer -- Sure, glad to. Take a look at the comments I appended to your answer. –  Pete Wilson Jan 19 '12 at 23:57
    
Thanks for taking the time to help answer the questions. I guess I thought I could come up with a grouping/categorization system that allowed items to intersect, but I realize I am approaching it the wrong way. –  bschaeffer Jan 20 '12 at 20:17
    
Sure thing. I emphasize again that if you come to grips with SELECT in its many permutations you'll find the tools to get to where you want to go. –  Pete Wilson Jan 20 '12 at 22:02
    
Yes, you were approaching it from the wrong end. Do the DB first and then design and implement your parent-child access scheme. –  Pete Wilson Jan 20 '12 at 22:22

Possible Alternative Solution

I am no expert with DB design, so I wanted to get Pete Wilson's input on my thoughts before I continued any further....

Material Lists & Items. material_lists would simply a way to initiate a relationship among a set of material_list_items. Each list item would belong to a list, and it would not be necessary to relate these lists to each other in anyway.

* material_lists
id   name         
---+------------+
1  | Widths     |
2  | Gauges     |
3  | TrackType  |

* material_list_items
id   name         list_id
---+------------+---------+
1  | 3 5/8      | 1       | 
2  | 6          | 1       |
3  | 25ga       | 2       |
4  | 20ga       | 2       |
5  | Regular    | 3       |
6  | Deflection | 3       |

Material Groups. material_groups would be a way to create a cascading relationship amongst a set of materials. Each group/sub-group could be a way to A) group together additional sub_groups, and/or B) assign a material_list to the group whose items are relevant to the relationship. Each group can have one list (although list can be re-used).

* material_groups
id   name         parent_id   list_id 
---+------------+-----------+---------+
1  | Studs      | null      | null    |
2  | Widths     | 1         | 1       |
3  | Gauges     | 2         | 2       |
4  | Track      | null      | null    |
5  | Widths     | 4         | 1       |
6  | Gauges     | 5         | 2       |
7  | TrackType  | 6         | 3       |

Materials. The materials table would be a "generated" set of data, with each entry representing a possible relationship between material_list_items and material_groups. The column item_id would represent the starting point for any possible relationship that could cascade down from it. For example, starting with the first entry (Studs > 3 5/8), additional child entries which would reference this row would be Studs > 3 5/8 > 25ga & Studs > 3 5/8 > 20ga. The group_id column would be a reference to group which the material belongs to which would allow for re-use of material_list_items while still creating a separate relationship. Entries which do not terminate (have no children) would be "non-reference-able" outside of this table. The following table/example shows this relationship (note the # next to the descriptions for each row for my idea of "non-reference-able").

* materials (a "generated" list)
id   item_id   parent_id  group_id
---+---------+-----------+---------+
1  | 1       | null      | 2       | # Studs > 3 5/8
2  | 2       | null      | 2       | # Studs > 6
3  | 3       | 1         | 3       |   Studs > 3 5/8 > 25ga
4  | 4       | 1         | 3       |   Studs > 3 5/8 > 20ga
5  | 3       | 2         | 3       |   Studs > 6 > 25ga
6  | 4       | 2         | 3       |   Studs > 6 > 20ga
7  | 1       | null      | 5       | # Track > 3 5/8
8  | 2       | null      | 5       | # Track > 6
9  | 3       | 7         | 6       | # Track > 3 5/8 > 25ga
10 | 4       | 7         | 6       | # Track > 3 5/8 > 20ga
11 | 3       | 8         | 6       | # Track > 6 > 25ga
12 | 4       | 8         | 6       | # Track > 6 > 20ga
13 | 5       | 9         | 7       |   Track > 3 5/8 > 25ga > Regular
14 | 6       | 9         | 7       |   Track > 3 5/8 > 25ga > Deflection
15 | 5       | 10        | 7       |   Track > 3 5/8 > 20ga > Regular
16 | 6       | 10        | 7       |   Track > 3 5/8 > 20ga > Deflection
17 | 5       | 11        | 7       |   Track > 6 > 25ga > Regular
18 | 6       | 11        | 7       |   Track > 6 > 25ga > Deflection
19 | 5       | 12        | 7       |   Track > 6 > 20ga > Regular
20 | 6       | 12        | 7       |   Track > 6 > 20ga > Deflection

I realize that this relationship requires a lot of work at the backend, but it's the only solution I could think of that would allow for what I described in my original question and wanted to see if there was any input into how successful/painful this implementation could be.

Should I go for something more simplified or does this seem like a good idea?


Pete response: Quickly: your alternative solution resembles your first proposed solution, so my remarks apply to the alt sol. Then: what possible real-world benefit do you expect to realize by imposing a non-DB structure on what is a DB-design problem? Apart from its being aesthetically pleasing to you, I can see no reward. Then: your tables are all mixed up. For a DB, you are taking almost the wrongest path that it's possible to take. Again, why oh why are you insisting on a structure that is so NOT a DB solution? You will be shooting yourself in the head next month if you persist. Any "cascading relationship" should be (must be, if you want to stay sane) expressed/realized in the way you access the DB not in its structure.

You can generate ideas about access and the ways it can express the relationships you're after by carefully, closely reading the select writeup and thinking creatively about it for a day or two. You'll have a bright flash of understanding and inside it will be your solution.

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