Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following foreach loop in C#:

foreach(var item in mod)
{
    int i;

    i = i + 1;
    if (i % 2 == 0)
    { 
        string y = "even number"; 
    }
}

How come I get the message that local variable is unassigned. I am trying to find the even number here.

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure this is where the error is? Did you omit any code? –  Tejs Jan 18 '12 at 22:26
    
Do you want i to increase each time the body of the loop is executed? –  jglouie Jan 18 '12 at 22:29
    
Because you tell the computer to calculate i + 1 without defining is initial value. –  Nappy Jan 18 '12 at 23:01
    
@NatePet did you have another question? –  jglouie Jan 27 '12 at 17:05
add comment

8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To resolve the message you are getting, you simply need to initialize it:

int i = 0;

If your intention is to count every item, then you will also need to change the scope of i to outside of the foreach. Otherwise, as you originally posted, the variable i will have the same value for every iteration of the loop.

See this code snippet for both the initialization and scope change:

 int i = 0;
 foreach (var item in mod)
 {
     i = i + 1; // is the first item considered even or odd?  that answer changes where this should go

     if (i % 2 == 0) { 
         string y = "even number"; 
     }
 }  
share|improve this answer
    
declaring outside the loop has nothing to do with it in this case. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 18 '12 at 22:37
    
@JoelCoehoorn Not for the actual error, but the code is logically wrong with the int inside the loop –  Rob Jan 18 '12 at 22:40
    
Not necessarily. We don't know what he's using it for, and since the result is never used outside the loop, declaring it inside to reduce it's scope may very well be the proper thing. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 18 '12 at 22:41
    
@JoelCoehoorn I agree that it has nothing to do with this error. I made the jump that the poster's intention was to do some type of counting with i. –  jglouie Jan 18 '12 at 22:49
    
It's possible, but given the even/odd check I see something more like printing out different styles for alternating rows as the loop runs. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 18 '12 at 22:56
add comment

You need to initialise your i variable:

int i = 0;

You're currently trying + 1 to an unassigned variable.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You get the warning because you are not assigning i before using it in i = i + 1. You want to declare i outside of your foreach loop, so you it isn't bound to the scope of the loop. Then initialize with 0 and use the increment feature. Something like:

int i = 0;
foreach (var item in mod)
{
    i++;

    if (i % 2 == 0)
    {
        string y = "even number";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

An alternative to what others have suggested here (although correct) would be to use a for loop, this would take care of i for you, e.g.

for (int i = 0; i < mod.length; i++)
{
    if (i % 2 == 0)
    {
      string y = "even number";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Change this: int i;

to this: int i = 0;

Values types in C# like int do have default values, but you're still not allowed to use an unassigned value-type variable.

share|improve this answer
    
The type is a red herring here. Both reference and value types have default values... but local variables need to be definitely assigned before use. –  Jon Skeet Jan 18 '12 at 22:29
    
Good point about reference types - "null" is still a default value. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 18 '12 at 22:30
add comment

You need to assign an initial value for i before you can do i=i+1

share|improve this answer
add comment

You have to initialize i. Right now the compiler is reading this as i = garbage in memory. So you have garbage in memory = garbage in memory + 1. That i could be equal to a string, a number, or anything.

 int i = 0;

In addition, you need to initialize that variable outside of the for...each loop, or it will keep resetting itself to 0.

 int i = 0;

 foreach(var item in mod){
     i = i + 1;

     if (i % 2 == 0) { 
         string y = "even number"; 
     }
 }  
share|improve this answer
add comment
   int i = 0;
   foreach(var item in mod)
   {
     if (i % 2 == 0) 
     { 
         string y = "even number"; 
     }
      i = i + 1;
    }  

//what are you doing with y and how are you returning y if you need it.. are you expecting to break out at some point.. ? what if item has zero items..??

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.