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To clarify, multiple students objects and all of them are getting the same value.

I know this question has been asked before, but I have had no luck with the other posts about his topic. I have a random number generator ranging from 1-3. I then us %2 to make a bool value true or false. Every time I run the program I either get all true or all false. Here is my code. I know that random is not really random. What can I do to get more random numbers.

Random random = new Random();

public Student()
{
    int randomLevel=random.Next(1,3);
    level = (randomLevel % 2 == 0);
}

public bool readingLevel()//this always returns one value for the entire program.
{
    return level;
}
share|improve this question
    
How are you consuming this class? – Daniel Casserly Jan 18 '12 at 23:01
    
Do you use it inside for loop? – Ferid Movsumov Jan 18 '12 at 23:01
2  
Of course this returns the same number for the entire program. You only generate the radnom number once, and then use that random number all the time. – tobier Jan 18 '12 at 23:03
1  
Is your issue that every student has the same readingLevel, or that each time you call it on the same student it stays the same? – CodesInChaos Jan 18 '12 at 23:07
1  
We really need more of your example. Answers are all over the place in terms of interpreting what the problem is. – Sion Sheevok Jan 18 '12 at 23:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are only assigning a random value to 'level' once during the constructor, so it will always have the initial value. Try:

public bool readingLevel()
{
     return (random.Next(1,3) % 2 == 0);
}

Edit:

Static Random random = new Random();
...
share|improve this answer
1  
Given the context, I'm assuming (yes, assuming) that he has multiple students and all of them are getting the same value. I'm sure his intent is to have a student have an unchanging level. – Sion Sheevok Jan 18 '12 at 23:03
    
I am trying to get multiple students with different values. I always thought the constructor was called every time a new object is created. If that is the case then shouldn't every object have a different value? – Aaron Jan 18 '12 at 23:30
    
@Aaron In that case you should use a static Random number generator for the class, as it stands each student is being created with the same seed value leading to your problem. See Edit – Andrew Hanlon Jan 18 '12 at 23:37
    
Thanks for the comment. Your first answer I knew, that second one I did not – Aaron Jan 19 '12 at 3:58

It looks like you're trying to get a random number!
Clippy

Well you can try something like this:

static Random random = new Random();

public Student()
{
    lock (random)
    {
        int randomLevel=random.Next(1,3);
        level = (randomLevel % 2 == 0);
    }
}
public bool readingLevel()//this always returns one value for the entire program.
{
    return level;
}

The problem with your snippet seems to be that you are instantiating a new Random class with each of your class instances. This is not the way Random is supposed to be used, but instead a single Random class instance should be used for acquiring multiple random numbers.

The Rationale for this is that Random in .Net uses a pseudo random algorithm based on state (a seed) that changes every time you ask for a new random number. By instantiating multiple random classes in a relatively short time span, there is a high chance that all of them will be initiated with the same seed (Based on system time) and all will give the same random number.

share|improve this answer
    
Simultaneous +1 and -1 for invoking Clippy. (+1 because it's funny; -1 because it's.. well, Clippy) – Igby Largeman Jan 18 '12 at 23:09

It looks like your random generator is an instance variable of the Student. Since the generator uses the current time as the seed, if you create a bunch of students within a short time, they will all have each have a generator with the same seed and the same results. You could make the random generator a static variable or, better yet, use constructor injection and pass the level into the Student's constructor.

class Student
{
  private static Random random = new Random();

  public Student()
  {
    level = random.NextDouble() < 0.5;
  }

  public bool readingLevel()
  {
    return level;
  }
}

or use constructor injection so your student class is deterministic.

class Student
{
  private boolean level;

  public Student(boolean readingLevel)
  {
    this.level = readingLevel;
  }
  public boolean readingLevel()
  {
    return level;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Create only one instance of Random and reuse it. Creating multiple instances of random in quick succession seeds to the same value and thus leads to the same sequence.

If your code in single threaded you can simply use a static property to hold the instance of Random.

The default seed value is derived from the system clock and has finite resolution. As a result, different Random objects that are created in close succession by a call to the default constructor will have identical default seed values and, therefore, will produce identical sets of random numbers. This problem can be avoided by using a single Random object to generate all random numbers. You can also work around it by modifying the seed value returned by the system clock and then explicitly providing this new seed value to the Random(Int32) constructor. For more information, see the Random(Int32) constructor.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h343ddh9.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
While this is obviously true, it's not at all the cause of his issue. – Noon Silk Jan 18 '12 at 23:03
    
@NoonSilk Why? Apart from this issue each instance of Student would get its own reading level. – CodesInChaos Jan 18 '12 at 23:05
    
It's possible I've misunderstood the specification of his problem. – Noon Silk Jan 18 '12 at 23:06
    
@NoonSilk Given the OP's clarifying comments, he wants each instance of Student to have a different, but constant value for readingLevel. – CodesInChaos Jan 21 '12 at 23:11
    
Indeed, that's why I removed the downvote before making my second comment. – Noon Silk Jan 22 '12 at 11:45
public Student()
{
    int randomLevel=random.Next(1,3);
    level = (randomLevel % 2 == 0);
}

seems very much like a constructor for the Student class. In this constructor you are basically calculating a random number and storing it inside the level field. So if you use the same instance of Student throughout your entire program and call the readingLevel() method multiple times on this instance it will obviously return the same value -> the one that was done during the construction of this instance and that you stored in the level field.

So you might consider moving the random number generation logic into the readingLevel() method instead of simply returning the same value over and over again:

public class Student
{
    private Random random = new Random();

    public bool readingLevel()
    {
        int randomLevel = random.Next(1,3);
        return (randomLevel % 2 == 0);
    }
}

Now everytime you call this method on the same instance you should get a new calculation of a random number.

share|improve this answer

Some others have said this, but I think the point deserves underscoring with an example.

public class Student
{
    Random random = new Random(); 

    public Student() 
    { 
        int randomLevel=random.Next(1,3); 
        level = (randomLevel % 2 == 0); 
    } 

    public bool readingLevel()//this always returns one value for the entire program. 
    { 
        return level; 
    } 
}

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var students = new List<Student>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            students.Add(new Student());

        //Now you have 10 Students; each Student has its own random number generator
        //The generators were created within microseconds of each other, so they most likely have THE SAME SEED
        //Because they have the same seed, they will generate identical sequences of numbers
        //Each student's reading level is calculated from the first call to .Next(1, 3) on its own RNG.
        //The RNGs have the same seed, so each will return the same value for the first call to .Next(1, 3)
        //Therefore, all students will have the same reading level!
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You are using random to simulate a true/false situation, so you are trying to limit the result to either 1 or 2. Given that you are doing an odd/even test on the result you might be better off doing:

int randomLevel = random.Next();
level = (randomLevel % 2 == 0);

Also If you create all your students in quick succession there's a good chance that your current code will return the same value for subsequent calls.

share|improve this answer

Well.

Consider what is happening here. When your Student is constructued, you get some random number, and then set it to the member variable level.

Then, at some other point, you call a function, readingLevel, which returns this previously set value.

Then, you may ponder to yourself: Exactly when would this function give a different value? Well, it will only do so when level gets a different value. And when does that happen? Well, it only happens in the constructor, so, that means, it never happens again for the life of the object ....

share|improve this answer
    
But I only want each object to have one value for readingLevel. If Level only gets a new value in the constructor, then wouldn't every time a new object is created the constructor would get called and a new readingLevel would get a new number. If that is the case it is doing what I want it to. However each object is getting the same result for readineLevel. Am I missing something – Aaron Jan 18 '12 at 23:26

Try the following. Move the selection of the random level to the readingLevel function.

Random random = new Random(); 
public Student() 
{ 
}

public bool readingLevel()//this always returns one value for the entire program. 
{ 
  int randomLevel=random.Next(1,3); 
  level = (randomLevel % 2 == 0); 
  return level; 
} 
share|improve this answer

That is because you are using the random.Next() and the level evaluation within the constructor of your class, remember that the constructor is only executed when you create a new instance of your object, for having it executed several times create a different method where you call the random and the level evaluation, that way you'll get different values every time or use Something like this:

public bool Level()
{
     int randomLevel=random.Next(1,3); 
     level = (randomLevel % 2 == 0); 
     return level;
}
share|improve this answer
    
level can't be a field and method at the same time... – CodesInChaos Jan 18 '12 at 23:13
    
@CodeInChaos: However, level and Level can be. Previous to his edit, it read as "public bool reading level()", which was syntactically invalid due to a typo'd space between reading and level, let alone naming a field and method the same. – Sion Sheevok Jan 18 '12 at 23:28
Random random = new Random(DateTime.Now.Ticks);
share|improve this answer
2  
The default constructor is already seeded by the time. – CodesInChaos Jan 18 '12 at 23:04
    
Well I guess you learn something new every day :) – Niko Drašković Jan 18 '12 at 23:06

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