Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following directories in my Subversion repository for a Visual Studio solution:

  • ProjectName
    • tags
    • branches
    • trunk
      • MySolution.sln
      • MyProject1 (dir)
      • MyProject2 (dir)

If I update MyProject1 from version 1.0.0 to 2.0.0, should I copy everything in trunk to a new directory under tags, or should I only copy everything in trunk/MyProject1 to a new directory under tags?

And, if the former is the correct way of doing things, how do I version an entire Visual Studio solution?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Take a look at the svn guide to understand basic versioning concepts.

Trunk is the main line of development so you can update from version 1.0.0 to 1.0.1, 2.0.0 etc.

Branch is a copy of your trunk to develop a feature or something else without affecting the Trunk. You can merge at any time the branch code to the trunk code or throw it away.

Tag is a snapshot at a given time of your trunk o branch.

In your case you can update from 1.0.0.0 to 2.0.0.0 in trunk and maybe keep a snapshot by tagging your 1.0.0.0 release (copying all trunk to a tag named 1.0.0.0).

First you can checkout ProjectName to your local disk, for example c:\working\ProjectName. In this way you have this first local structure:

  • ProjectName
    • tags
    • branches
    • trunk
      • MySolution.sln
      • MyProject1 (dir)
      • MyProject2 (dir)

When you reach your 1.0.0.0 release tag it to have this structure:

  • ProjectName
    • tags
      • 1.0.0.0
        • MySolution.sln
        • MyProject1 (dir)
        • MyProject2 (dir)
    • branches
    • trunk
      • MySolution.sln
      • MyProject1 (dir)
      • MyProject2 (dir)

Then update to 2.0.0.0 and so on:

  • ProjectName
    • tags
      • 1.0.0.0
        • MySolution.sln
        • MyProject1 (dir)
        • MyProject2 (dir)
      • 2.0.0.0
        • MySolution.sln
        • MyProject1 (dir)
        • MyProject2 (dir)
    • branches
    • trunk
      • MySolution.sln
      • MyProject1 (dir)
      • MyProject2 (dir)

At any time you can work on trunk or release 1 or 2 (maybe for debugging or applying patches)

share|improve this answer
    
This is the answer I thought I'd get. So, I should include MyProject2 in the tag even though it didn't change at all. –  ken Jan 19 '12 at 13:41
    
You have to think at your solution as a whole. So you tag entire solution not only MyProject2. And don't worry, it's not a space waste because a tag is only a "reference" to a particular revision. No code is duplicated. –  Be.St. Jan 19 '12 at 14:21
1  
What I find a little troubling about that method is that the tag-naming scheme becomes arbitrary. I know the version of a live MyProject2 dll because the version number is embedded in the assembly. But I have no easy way of correlating that assembly version with an svn tag because the svn tag version is arbitrary and has no correlation with the assembly version. Oh well... –  ken Jan 19 '12 at 14:56
    
Ok, this is a different problem and require more than 500 character of a comment :-) You're right, it's very important to keep in sync assembly version with svn revision (SVN Revision is the sequential number incremented at each commit). This problem has different solution (from easiest to complex). 1 - in a small dev team you can get next SVN revision number and modify AssemblyVersion before committing. 2 - you can use MSBuildTask to automate above process 3 - you can add a Continuous Server to your software lifecycle to tag automatically your SVN revision –  Be.St. Jan 19 '12 at 15:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.