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I am going to write a service to manipulate a database that all Insert/Update/Delete/Select will be executed via this service.

However, I only know socket services (Web service is a kind of socket service because it uses network layer).

What I am concerning is the performance of socket services. Because they needs to go through the network layer. So OS needs to start the network layer and then pass all packets to my program that maybe have performance overhead on network layer.

So my question is: is there any non-socket services working in both Windows and Linux?


Updated at 19th January 2012

I found the solution here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inter-process_communication

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2 Answers

You can use named pipes for communication. Turns out there's such thing for windows also, look here. For example you can connect this way to MySQL on Linux (usually /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock).

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Is this over the network, or on same box?

If over the network, sockets are fine, WCF, web services are all fine (this is how SQL Server, Oracle and everything else work...)

If local, same box, you can use a shared memory approach, and avoid the network completely.

FWIW, Shared Memory totally works on Windows. See CreateSharedMemory function from Win32-SDK. In .NET, you can use .NET remoting with shared memory as the transport. There are many ways to do this on Windows.

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Yes, they are in the same box. Is shared memory approach able for Windows environment? –  Alex Yeung Jan 19 '12 at 0:26
    
Yes, Shared Memory totally works on Windows. See CreateSharedMemory function from Win32-SDK. In .NET, you can use .NET remoting with shared memory as the transport. There are many ways to do this on Windows. –  Jonesome Jan 20 '12 at 0:05
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