Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have

public enum BaseActions implements Actions{
    STAND (0,0,0),
    TURN (1,1,1);
    //other stuff
}

public enum CoolActions implements Actions{
   STAND (0,2,3),
   TURN(1,6,9);
   //other stuff
}

public enum LooserActions implements Actions{
   STAND (0,-2,-3),
   TURN(1,-6,-9);
   //other stuff
}

public interface Actions {
       //interface methods
}

class A {
    Actions mCurrentAction;
    protected void notifyNewAction(final Actions pAction, final Directions pDirection){
         //body of the method
    }

    public void doStuff(final Actions pAction) {
         if(pAction.getMyId() > 0)
              notifyNewAction(BaseActions.STAND, myDirection);
         else
             notifyNewAction(BaseActions.TURN, myDirection);
    }
}

class B extends A{
     public void doMyStuff() {
           doStuff(CoolActions.STAND);
     }
}

class C extends A{
     public void doMyStuff() {
           doStuff(LooserActions.STAND);
     }
}

i would like to make A use CoolActions when doStuff is called from B and LooserActions when called from C. One of the ways i think i can do it is to use generics, and then in B and C use

doStuff<CoolActions>(CoolActions.STAND)

and have in A

public void doStuff<T extends EnumActions&Actions>(final Actions pAction) {
             if(pAction.getMyId() > 0)
                  notifyNewAction(T.STAND, myDirection);
             else
                 notifyNewAction(T.TURN, myDirection);
        }

where EnumActions is a base enum that just contains the declaration of the enum's elements, and nothing more, something like an interface for enums, but enums can't extend another class since they already extends Enum, and an interface can't provide what i mean. Another way would be to make the enums implements a EnumActions interface that has

public interface EnumActions {
    public <T> T getStand();
    public <T> T getTurn();
}

and have

 class A {
        Actions mCurrentAction;
        protected void notifyNewAction(final Actions pAction, final Directions pDirection){
             //body of the method
        }

        public <T implements EnumActions> void doStuff(final Actions pAction) {
             if(pAction.getMyId() > 0)
                  notifyNewAction(T.getStand(), myDirection);
             else
                 notifyNewAction(T.getTrun(), myDirection);
        }
    }

and

public enum CoolActions implements Actions, EnumActions{
   STAND (0,2,3),
   TURN(1,6,9);
    public CoolActions getStand();
    public CoolActions getTurn();
   //other stuff
}

class B extends A{
     public void doMyStuff() {
           doStuff<CoolActions>(CoolActions.STAND);
     }
}

But 1)i don't know if it would work 2) I lose the advanteges of using enums 3) this seams a really bad way to handle this 4) i would have to write a lot( X enum fields per Y different enums). I changed from static final fields to enum to improve readability and order, and this seams to make things even harder.

Am i designing this in the wrong way? How can i handle this? Is there a preferred way to solve this problem? Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems like enums add nothing and are not going to do what you want. Maybe you should just use a normal class hierarchy - make BaseActions, CoolActions and LooserActions just classes that implement Actions and STAND and TURN methods in those classes.

share|improve this answer
    
So, what's the reason to have enums if they can be replaced by classes and can't do what they are designed for(limit the choices to only a set of variables)? I never used them, and when i first thought they would be useful they cant fulfil my needs.. And surfing on the net i found many other situations like mine.. – Makers_F Jan 18 '12 at 23:48
2  
@Makers_F: enums do exactly what they were designed to do. But they cannot be extended and so are not polymorphic. Your design requires polymorphism, so don't use enums. – Skip Head Jan 18 '12 at 23:56

it's ugly, but it may do what you want:

interface Actions {
    int getMyId();
}
enum BaseActions implements Actions {
    STAND(0, 0, 0), TURN(1, 1, 1);
    BaseActions(int x, int y, int z) {}
    @Override public int getMyId() {
        return 0;
    }
}
enum CoolActions implements Actions {
    STAND(0, 2, 3), TURN(1, 6, 9);
    CoolActions(int x, int y, int z) {}
    @Override public int getMyId() {
        return 0;
    }
}
enum LooserActions implements Actions {
    STAND(0, -2, -3), TURN(1, -6, -9);
    LooserActions(int x, int y, int z) {}
    @Override public int getMyId() {
        return 0;
    }
}
class Directions {}
class A {
    Actions mCurrentAction;
    protected void notifyNewAction(final Actions pAction, final Directions pDirection) {
    System.out.println(pAction+" "+pAction.getClass());
    }
    public void doStuff(final Actions pAction) {
        Directions myDirection = null;
        Enum e=(Enum)pAction;
        if(e instanceof CoolActions)
            e=CoolActions.valueOf(e.name());
        else if(e instanceof LooserActions)
            e=LooserActions.valueOf(e.name());
        if (pAction.getMyId() > 0) notifyNewAction((Actions)e, myDirection);
        else
            notifyNewAction((Actions)e, myDirection);
    }
}
class B extends A {
    public void doMyStuff() {
        doStuff(CoolActions.STAND);
    }
}
class C extends A {
    public void doMyStuff() {
        doStuff(LooserActions.STAND);
    }
}
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new A();
        a.doStuff(BaseActions.STAND);
        B b = new B();
        b.doMyStuff();
        C c = new C();
        c.doMyStuff();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it's ugly ;) Btw i wont to this kind of hack because i'll have a lot of Actions, and then the code would become an immense if else, and would be hard to maintain (add/remove Actions, etc..) But in a different situation this could be a good workaround – Makers_F Jan 20 '12 at 14:45
    
seems like the ugly can go away: public void doStuff(final Actions pAction) { /* does this still really do what you want? */ Directions myDirection = null; if (pAction.getMyId() > 0) notifyNewAction(pAction, myDirection); else notifyNewAction(pAction, myDirection); } – Ray Tayek Jan 20 '12 at 22:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.