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Disclaimer: I realize asking "Why doesn't my regular expression work" is pretty amateur.

I have looked at the documentation, though I'm just plain struggling. I have a url (as a string) and what I want is to replace the placeholders (i.e. {objectID} and {queryTerm}

For a while now, I've been making attempts like this:

var _serviceURL = "http://my-server.com/rest-services/someObject/{objectID}/entries?term={queryTerm}";

var re1 = new RegExp("/{([A-Za-z])+}","gi");  
var re2 = new RegExp("/{([A-Za-z]+)}+","gi");  
var re3 = new RegExp("/{([A-Za-z])+}","gi");  
var re4 = new RegExp("/({[A-Za-z]+})+","gi");  
var re5 = new RegExp("({[A-Za-z]+})+","gi");  
var re6 = new RegExp("({[A-Za-z]}+)*","g");  
var re6a = new RegExp("({([a-z]+)})+","gi");  

var re7 = /{([^}]+)}/g;

var tokens =  re6A.exec(_serviceURL);
if (null != tokens.length ){
    for(i = 0; i < tokens.length; i++){
        var t = tokens[i];
        console.log("tokens[i]: " + t);
    }            
}
else {
    console.log("RegEx fail...")
}

re6a above produces an array like this upon execution:

tokens: Array[3]
    0: "{objectID}"
    1: "{objectID}"
    2: "objectID"

Related to the scenario above:

  1. Why is it I'm never getting the queryTerm ?
  2. Does the RegExp 'i' (ignore case) flag mean I can list a character class like [a-z] and also capture [A-Z] ?
  3. Which method of constructing a RegExp object is better? ...new RegExp(...); or var regExp = /{([^}]+)}/g; . In terms of "what's better", what I mean is cross-browser compatibility and as similar to other RegEx implementations (if I'm learning RegEx, I want to get the most value I can out of it).
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does the RegExp i (ignore case) flag mean I can list a character class like [a-z] and also capture [A-Z]?

Yes, it'll capture them all.

Which method of constructing a RegExp object is better? new RegExp(...) or var regExp = /{([^}]+)}/g;? In terms of "what's better", what I mean is cross-browser compatibility and as similar to other RegEx implementations (if I'm learning RegEx, I want to get the most value I can out of it).

You should definitely use the literal notation.
It gets compiled once at runtime, instead of every time you use it.
They're both equally cross browser compatible.


All that said, I'd use this:

_serviceURL.match(/[^{}]+(?=})/g);

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/CAugU/


Here's an explanation of the above regex:

[    opens the character set
 ^    negates the set. Will only match whatever is NOT in these brackets
 {}   match anything that is NOT a curly brace
]    close the character set
+    match that as many times as possible
(?=  ascertain that it is possible to match the following here (won't be included in the match, this is called a lookahead)
 }    match a curly brace
)    close the lookahead
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Sorry, Joseph. How about the queryTerm ? –  b.long Jan 18 '12 at 23:24
    
@BrianL. - Check out the fiddle I just added. –  Joseph Silber Jan 18 '12 at 23:28
    
That jsFiddle is great, I didn't realize they offer Firebug Lite inside the runner. Thanks for breaking down the RegEx interpretation as well. I went back to the docs and realized ^ has a different meaning inside a character set. Since the expression matches "anything that is NOT a curly brace" , how does it know where to start? –  b.long Jan 18 '12 at 23:36
    
@BrianL. - When the ^ appears at the beginning of a character set, it serves a different purpose: it negates the set. See my added explanation above. –  Joseph Silber Jan 18 '12 at 23:37
    
@BrianL. - without the lookahead, it'll also match what's before the {: jsfiddle.net/CAugU/1 –  Joseph Silber Jan 18 '12 at 23:38
show 1 more comment

As you're going to replace the placeholders, it seems more natural to use replace rather than match, for example:

var _serviceURL = "http://my-server.com/rest-services/someObject/{objectID}/entries?term={queryTerm}"

var values = {
    objectID: 1234,
    queryTerm: "hello"
}

var result = _serviceURL.replace(/{(.+?)}/g, function($0, $1) {
    return values[$1]
})

yields http://my-server.com/rest-services/someObject/1234/entries?term=hello

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