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I have done a great deal of research into this topic of an 'event loop' that does asynchronous IO using a single thread. My understanding is that, for instance, nodeJS code runs in a single-threaded environment, but does pass off jobs to parallel threads behind-the-scenes. Meaning everything runs concurrently except the code and the interpreter, which just passes off jobs and manages callbacks, in a single-threaded manner.

My question is with regards to IO in Windows and ThreadPool threading specifically, especially file IO and database reads/writes. Typically in a .NET environment that uses multi-threading you might see this:

lock(sync)
{
          // do some IO
}

To protect certain functions from concurrency issues, like two threads trying to save records to the same sql table or file.

My question is two-fold,

1) When nodeJS says it does 'Asynchronous IO' does it mean that it actually writes to a database or file concurrently? I think that would be up to the underlying device / operating system, and not nodeJS, but I'm trying to clarify.

2) If some IO operations have to be or at least should be atomic (not done concurrently), how is 'Asynchronous IO' of any help? Couldn't it be wasteful to spawn threads to do IO if you just end up having to lock() alot of those operations anyway?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When nodeJS says it does 'Asynchronous IO' does it mean that it actually writes to a database or file concurrently? I think that would be up to the underlying device / operating system, and not nodeJS, but I'm trying to clarify.

It's up to nodeJS whether it does other things while it is writing to a database or file. The concurrency does not refer to performing the same type of operation on the same target. It refers to performing different types of operations or operations on different targets.

If some IO operations have to be or at least should be atomic (not done concurrently), how is 'Asynchronous IO' of any help? Couldn't it be wasteful to spawn threads to do IO if you just end up having to lock() alot of those operations anyway?

Again, same response. Only if it's the same type of operation on the same target will the locks conflict. Otherwise, if they are requesting locks, they'll request different locks and won't get in each other's way.

The implementation specifics depend on the type of operation. For example, a thread can take ownership of a particular resource and process operations for that resource until it runs out of things to do. While it's handling that resource, other operations on that same resource can be dispatched to that very thread. That way, you don't start a thread just to wait for another thread to finish just to force a pointless context switch.

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Any form of asynchronous IO is based on two premises:

  1. Your main application thread is not blocked while the IO occurs
  2. If multiple outstanding asynchronous IO requests are in contention for a particular resource (e.g. a file or a record in a table), then you can expect one of:
    1. One or more of the operations will fail
    2. The operations will succeed, but with no gaurantee of data invariants being preserved
    3. The operations will become serialized automatically.

Option 2.3 does not undermine the usefullness of asynchronous IO, because presumably the contentions only occur for a small fraction of all IO requests.

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I think that when it refers to Asynchronous IO it refers to the fact you can perform an IO operation and it will run in the background, and then you can do other things that don't require that IO until you receive the callback.

This would be useful in a server environment where you are receiving multiple requests. While you are waiting for an IO operation to complete you can service another client.

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There is a good article about it at hueniverse.com/2011/06/the-style-of-non-blocking –  NoxHarmonium Jan 19 '12 at 0:17
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about 2., operations can be sequenced so that one operation only starts after the ones it's causally dependent on have finished, and most systems that service the io operations that result from asynchronous io should be capable of supporting large numbers of in flight operations and those systems that provide atomic operations may preform locking internally but they are also far less likely to have locking errors than your program. but then again atomic operations are best when they can be composed into atomic transactions.

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