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I have a partial view for displaying a list of items, I use this partial view in several different places. Inside this partial view I use a paginator -

@Html.PagedListPager(Model, page => Url.Action(null, new { page = page }))

This results in the paginator showing page urls for whatever Action and View i'm already looking at.

Problem is, on my search page I use a query string for the search string, and the Url.Action method does not include existing querystring parameters.

Instead of /Search?s=bla&page=3 I end up with /Search?page=3

How can I generate a url using the existing query string?

Edit:

Here is my code

    public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
    {
        routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");


        routes.Add(
        "Search",
        new SearchRoute("Search", new MvcRouteHandler())
        {
            Defaults = new RouteValueDictionary(
                new { controller = "Search", action = "Index" })
        }); 


        routes.MapRoute(
            "Default",
            "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
            new { controller = "Call", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }


        );



    }

    public class SearchRoute : Route
    {
        public SearchRoute(string url, IRouteHandler routeHandler)
            : base(url, routeHandler)
        {
        }

        public override VirtualPathData GetVirtualPath(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary values)
        {

            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(Url);

            if (HttpContext.Current != null)
            {

                string s = HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["s"];

                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                    values.Add("s", s);

            }

            return base.GetVirtualPath(requestContext, values);
        }
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using a custom route, you can preserve the query string because most Url generation logic uses the route to generate the URL. In this case I am checking the Request object for a query string called XXX and adding it into the route if it exists, you can make it more generic if you like.

using System.Web;
using System.Web.Routing;

public class PreserveQueryStringRoute : Route
{
    public PreserveQueryStringRoute(string url, IRouteHandler routeHandler)
        : base(url, routeHandler)
    {
    }

    public override VirtualPathData GetVirtualPath(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary values)
    {
        if(HttpContext.Current != null)
        {
            values = new RouteValueDictionary(values);   //this is the bug fix!

            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["XXX"]))
                values.Add("XXX", HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["XXX"]);

        }

        var path = base.GetVirtualPath(requestContext, values);
        return path;
    }
}

Register the route as per normal in the global.ascx (though probably not for such a generic match as I have below)

        routes.Add(
            "Default",
            new PreserveQueryStringRoute("{controller}/{action}/{id}", new MvcRouteHandler())
            {
                Defaults = new RouteValueDictionary(
                    new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional })
            });   

Edit:

Ok, here's an update.. its a bug fix, and an example of how to register the route (See corrected code above for bug fix)

Here's how to register it:

    routes.Add(      
    "Search",      
    new SearchRoute("Search", new MvcRouteHandler())      
    {      
        Constraints = new RouteValueDictionary(      
            new { controller = "Search", action = "Index" })      
    }); 
share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic. You da man. If anyone else uses this, remember to put the call to Routes.Add above the default route. –  NoPyGod Jan 19 '12 at 1:44
    
Hmm wait a minute.. this might not be working properly –  NoPyGod Jan 19 '12 at 1:57
    
It's putting the query string on all of the urls generated on my search page. Can that be fixed? I only need the query string on search urls. –  NoPyGod Jan 19 '12 at 2:00
    
And infact it doesn't matter where I am, if I put xxx=something in my query string, it'll be added to all generated urls. –  NoPyGod Jan 19 '12 at 2:10
    
The way I registered the route above (just as an example) means that it'll match pretty much any route.. You should register it in a less generic way for it to only affect url generation for specific pages –  Martin Booth Jan 20 '12 at 3:03

Here's how I do this:

I've implemented a few extension methods to convert query string to RouteValueDictionary and set individual items in it:

public static class RouteValueDictionaryExtensions
{
    public static RouteValueDictionary ToRouteValues(this NameValueCollection queryString)
    {
        if (queryString == null || queryString.HasKeys() == false) 
            return new RouteValueDictionary();

        var routeValues = new RouteValueDictionary();
        foreach (string key in queryString.AllKeys)
            routeValues.Add(key, queryString[key]);

        return routeValues;
    }

    public static RouteValueDictionary Set(this RouteValueDictionary routeValues, string key, string value)
    {
        routeValues[key] = value;
        return routeValues;
    }

    public static RouteValueDictionary Merge(this RouteValueDictionary primary, RouteValueDictionary secondary)
    {
        if (primary == null || primary.Count == 0)
        {
            return secondary ?? new RouteValueDictionary();
        }

        if (secondary == null || secondary.Count == 0)
            return primary;

        foreach (var pair in secondary)
            primary[pair.Key] = pair.Value;

        return primary;
    }

    public static RouteValueDictionary Merge(this RouteValueDictionary primary, object secondary)
    {
        return Merge(primary, new RouteValueDictionary(secondary));
    }
}

This makes it possible to create links such as:

Url.RouteUrl(Request.QueryString.ToRouteValues().Set("Key", "Value"))

Or this:

Url.RouteUrl(Request.QueryString.ToRouteValues().Merge(new {key = "value"}))

I can also chain these extension methods to achieve more flexibility:

Url.RouteUrl(Request.QueryString.ToRouteValues().Set("Key", "Value").Set("AnotherKey", "AnotherValue"))
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