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How can you make a class method static after the class is defined? In other words, why does the third case fail?


>>> class b:
...  @staticmethod
...  def foo():
...   pass
...
>>> b.foo()
>>> class c:
...  def foo():
...   pass
...  foo = staticmethod( foo )
...
>>> c.foo()
>>> class d:
...  def foo():
...   pass
...
>>> d.foo = staticmethod( d.foo )
>>> d.foo()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unbound method foo() must be called with d instance as first argument (got nothing instead)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

After the class is defined, foo is an unbound method object (a wrapper that ties the function to the class), not a function. The wrapper's going to try to pass an instance of the class (self) to the function as the first argument and so it complains that you haven't given it one.

staticmethod() should really be used only with functions. While the class is still being defined (as in your b and c) foo() is still a function, as the method wrapper is applied when the class definition is complete.

It's possible to extract the function from the unbound method object, apply staticmethod(), and assign it back to the class.

class d(object):
    def foo():
       pass

d.foo = staticmethod(d.foo.im_func)

By the way, I believe your code would actually work as-is on Python 3 because methods on a class object are plain functions (but of course, for the same reason, you don't really need to mark them with staticmethod() in the first place).

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Shouldn't that be d.foo.im_func ? –  Óscar López Jan 19 '12 at 1:44
    
Yes, thanks. Fixed! –  kindall Jan 19 '12 at 1:48

You must pass the function, not the unbound method.

>>> class d:
...   def foo():
...     pass
... 
>>> d.foo = staticmethod(d.foo.im_func)
>>> d.foo()
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